Category Archives: Uncategorized

Pulpit Committee Q & A – Part 3

When their pastoral offices becomes vacant, many Baptist churches form what is know as a “pulpit is committee”.   A pulpit committee typically consists of several church members whom the body has tasked with seeking, interviewing, and recommending pastoral candidates.  Have you ever wondered what kinds of questions these churches ask pastoral candidates?  How do you think potential pastors should answer these questions?  In this on-going series, I will provide actual inquiries from a questionnaire sent to me by the pulpit committee of a Southern Baptist Church, along with my answers.  Each part of this series will examine a different question and answer from the church’s questionnaire.  Feel free to interact in the comment section with your own opinions of how the questions should have been asked and answered.

(Note: The identity and location of the church has been replaced with generic terms).

Question:

What is your position on continuing education?

Answer:

The pastor is charged with the teaching the congregation.  If he isn’t educated, how can he educate others? I graduated from seminary but that doesn’t mean I should stop studying the Bible.  I do not feel like I require further formal education, however, there are never enough biblical commentaries to read.  Also, discussions with other believers can sharpen one’s theology.  

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

Advertisements

Pulpit Committee Q & A – Part 2

When their pastoral offices becomes vacant, many Baptist churches form what is know as a “pulpit is committee”.   A pulpit committee typically consists of several church members whom the body has tasked with seeking, interviewing, and recommending pastoral candidates.  Have you ever wondered what kinds of questions these churches ask pastoral candidates?  How do you think potential pastors should answer these questions?  In this on-going series, I will provide actual inquiries from a questionnaire sent to me by the pulpit committee of a Southern Baptist Church, along with my answers.  Each part of this series will examine a different question and answer from the church’s questionnaire.  Feel free to interact in the comment section with your own opinions of how the questions should have been asked and answered.

(Note: The identity and location of the church has been replaced with generic terms).

Question:

What are your thoughts regarding visitation, specifically the visitation of members, prospects, the sick, shut-ins, nursing home residents, and the bereaved? 

Answer:

I think that the pastor should make it a point to periodically visit every member of the congregation, whether or not they are sick or shut-in.  I believe it is incumbent upon church members, especially ones gifted for service and mercy, to visit the sick and minister to the bereaved. The pastor and deacons are, however, formally charged with providing this kind of care by virtue of their office.  It is incumbent on every church member to share the gospel. “Prospects” should be the concern of every member of the church. The pastor is primarily tasked with spiritual care while the Deacons are tasked with physical care. I think those who fill these offices are reasonably expected to visit with and minister to each type of person listed.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

The Sad Sacrament of Softball

Therefore, brethren, since we have confidence to enter the holy place by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He inaugurated for us through the veil, that is, His flesh, and since we have a great priest over the house of God, let us draw near with a sincere heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful; and let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near.” Hebrews 10:19-25

From 2003 to 2010, I played in 83 softball tournaments. If I hadn’t broken my leg taking out a shortstop in 2007, I would have played in many more. Including league play, I made 1,402 plate appearances during that time span. I grew up playing little league baseball and watching my parents play church softball. When I was old enough, I joined the church softball team myself. Our church’s team played in both local and travel tournaments. Some of our family vacations revolved around it. My mom coached middle school fast-pitch softball, which she grew up playing in the 1960s. My grandfather coached her team; when Woodland Park Baptist Church sponsored it and people asked them what the “WPB” on their shirts meant, they told people “We Play Ball”. Everybody who knows us knows that my family loves all things softball. Lately, however, I’ve been disturbed by the amount of devotion I see being garnered by sports culture.
Yesterday, an old friend of mine posted a video of her teenaged daughter giving a devotion to her tournament softball team. I watched with dismay as the young lady said the following:

“One way we use softball to worship Jesus is, on Sundays if we can’t make it to church due to a softball tournament, God blesses us with Ms. Melissa who does a devotion with us.”

Run the numbers. There are about 12 girls on a youth softball team. A decent-sized double-elimination tournament will draw about 16 teams. That means, on any given weekend, there are 192 girls missing church, along with their parents and siblings. They are not missing time at the public school. If they were, they would be declared truant by the authorities and their parents would be made to answer for keeping them out of school. They aren’t missing time at school, though; they are missing time at church. Their hierarchy of values looks about like this:

School > Softball > Church

To whom will their parents answer for that? Ask yourself if Jesus considers “missing church due to a softball tournament” is something He considers a form of worship. Jesus understands that sometimes people can’t make it to church due to performing acts of mercy, falling ill, or experiencing inclement weather. Playing softball is not a reason people “can’t” make it to church. Playing softball is a reason they don’t make it to church, because they consider playing ball more important than gathering together with God’s people. Christian parents demonstrate the same level of commitment to Christ’s church as non –Christian parents when they forsake the gathering together of the brethren to take their children to play youth sports: zero. That a team pauses to hold a devotion in Sunday morning while they are skipping church is, arguably, not a demonstration of worship but an affront to God. Exactly what qualified teacher is leading such devotion? Christ gifted the church, not the youth softball team, with teachers. The church, not the softball team, can perform the ordinances of Baptist and Communion.
Somewhere out there in my home state of Tennessee, there is a young girl who can knock the fire out of the softball but has been misled to believe softball is something that can be used to “worship” Jesus while skipping church on Sunday. That young woman and her teammates desperately need discipleship in a church and parents training them in the way they should go, not a hackneyed devotion at the ballpark. When considering the amount of money families spend on travel ball culture (gas, hotels, eating out, tournament fees, team fees, equipment, and pitching lessons) one wonders how they have any money left over to give to the local church. How many young people have you seen lately washing cars in the K-Mart parking lot or selling donuts door-to-door to raise money for their softball teams? Now, how many have to seen evangelizing door to door?
For that little girl who thinks she is worshiping Jesus when she skips church to play softball, I lament. For skipping church to play softball tournaments on 08/17/03, 08/21/05, 07/30/06, and 08/13/06, I repent. May God forgive us.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

Pulpit Committee Q & A – Part 1

When their pastoral offices becomes vacant, many Baptist churches form what is know as a “pulpit is committee”.   A pulpit committee typically consists of several church members whom the body has tasked with seeking, interviewing, and recommending pastoral candidates.  Have you ever wondered what kinds of questions these churches ask pastoral candidates?  How do you think potential pastors should answer these questions?  In this on-going series, I will provide actual inquiries from a questionnaire sent to me by the pulpit committee of a Southern Baptist Church, along with my answers.  Each part of this series will examine a different question and answer from the church’s questionnaire.  Feel free to interact in the comment section with your own opinions of how the questions should have been asked and answered.

(Note: The identity and location of the church has been replaced with generic terms).

Question:

Barring statistics, what is you goal for “longevity” at XYZ Baptist Church? i.e., is it your goal to make XYZ Baptist and Anytown, USA your home for the duration of your life?

Answer:

Proverbs 16:9 says “The mind of man plans his way but the LORD directs his steps.”  I think it is folly to plan to make one particular place home for the rest of one’s life.  Abraham, was called to leave his home to fulfill the task the Lord has prepared for him. The Lord calls us to be salt and light wherever He has directed us.  I think it is unfortunate that some pastors do “career planning” where church life is concerned. XYZ Baptist would not be considered a career “stepping stone” for me.  In other words, I would not make it a goal to leave the church but rather a goal to shepherd the church for as long as the Lord allows. Optimally, churches would be able to raise their pastors from within their populations without seeking someone from the outside to be hired in as pastor.  Most of the time, this is not the case. The Lord has blessed me with the career prospects to be able to support my family in secular work without making a career out of church work. It would be a blessing to serve bi-vocationally and not fall prey to the temptation of looking for the next big church job.  Pastors should consider themselves church members just like everyone else and endeavor not to leave the church unless they needed to move out of town (and being mysteriously “called” by God to a bigger church with a bigger salary is not the kind of moving I am talking about) or something like that. My goal at XYZ Baptist would be to lead it to be a church that reflects the New Testament for as long as God allows me to do so.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

A Short, Biblical Explanation of “Sowing Discord”

Proverbs 6 condemns “one who spreads strife among brothers” (NASB). This scripture is often used as a catch-all to condemn all forms of controversy in a church. One who disagrees with the group, brings an item of trouble to the table, or insists on church discipline against a prominent member of a church can be labeled as a “sower of discord”. This is a gross misapplication of Proverbs 6. The rather nebulous accusation of “sowing discord” is too often thrown around by supposed biblical authorities to silence any form of concerned dissent. Where sinners are accused of adultery, a mistress can be produced. Where sinners are accused of theft, stolen property can be produced. Where a supposed sinner is accused of “the sin of sowing discord” often the evidence that can be produced is a disagreeable pastor or denominational leader.

The term “sowing discord” has found its way into the evangelical lexicon through the King James Version of Proverbs Chapter 6 16-19:

16 These six things doth the Lord hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him:
17 A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood,
18 An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief,
19 A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.

Since the Bible speaks of sowing discord as something the Lord hates, those accused to this sin can be quick to drop the issue they have raised out of fear of upsetting God himself. However, a careful examination of the text indicates the “sowing discord” is not a mere matter of disagreement. Proverbs 6:16-19 (NASB) speaks of “six things which the Lord hates, Yes seven which are an abomination to Him.” These things are presented in a Hebrew poetic structure known as chiasm:

Haughty Eyes
A lying tongue
Hands that shed innocent blood
A heart that devises wicked plans
Feet that run rapidly to evil
A false witness that utters lies
One who spreads strife among brothers.

Six things manifest themselves in a seventh thing, the thing that the Lord emphatically hates – a heart that devises wicked plans. A heart that devises wicked plans is the highlight of the condemnation. Wicked plans are carried out by hands that shed innocent blood and feet that run rapidly to evil. The hands and feet proceed from lying tongues and false witnesses. The lying tongue and the false witness proceed from haughty eyes and the one who spreads strife among brethren. These verses portray a level of evil and violence, of dishonestly and guile, that hardly amount to presenting a disagreement or controversy before a church body. One should not be afraid to be labeled a “sower of discord” for standing up for what’s right. A heart that loves the church stands up for the people of the church and the holiness of the church, even when it is uncomfortable. Spirit-led people put away the deeds of the flesh and do not devise wicked plans. Raising issues of concern at church or within a denomination isn’t sowing discord at all. To the contrary, it’s loving Jesus and loving the body.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

The Blackball Rolls Downhill – Church Discipline Bleeds Across Town

I was baptized at Tabernacle Baptist Church (TBC) in Cartersville, GA. I was married there. The church endorsed my application to seminary; one of my class projects was a growth plan for the church. My children have attended PreK there for two years. My parents are members. I attended Sunday services there on April 29th. On April 30th, I was informed that I am no longer allowed on the TBC campus for Sunday worship services. Richard Brown, the very pastor who performed my marriage and signed my seminary endorsement called me Monday morning to tell me that TBC’s security personnel had been informed to be on the lookout for me. The pastoral staff has, in Richard’s words chosen to “protect the flock” from me because I “sow discord”. Part of this protection is to ensure that I don’t so much as set foot on the property of Tabernacle Baptist Church to sit in its pews during Sunday Service. What did I do to warrant such treatment?

As those who follow this blog already know, I was removed from the membership of Rowland Springs Baptist Church (RSBC) during a special-called church conference on April 22nd, 2018. The official sin for which I was removed from membership was “sowing discord”. The real reason, however, involves something much more sinister. Against the wishes of the church leadership, I took a stand, a Tom-Petty-style “won’t back down” type of stand, against the cult of Freemasonry which permeates that church. RSBC is a haven for Freemasonry and I was removed from membership for opposing that demonic cult in my church.

https://podomatic.com/embed/html5/episode/8771739?autoplay=false

Before my wife and I could leave the RSBC campus on the 22nd, we were stopped by uniformed Sheriff’s deputies (who had obviously been notified before the church conference was over). The deputies issued a formal criminal trespass warning and informed me that I was not allowed back on church property. I was leaving peaceably but the cops had already been called. This was the treatment I received from RSBC.

Obviously, I needed a different church service to attend the next Sunday morning. My wife wanted to go to TBC. Our kids like it there and its senior pastor, Don Hattaway, is good preacher. So, we went to TBC. I found out pretty soon that I was not welcome. I was told not to come back. I realize that some readers may be taken aback by this. Should they be?

In Tabernacle’s defense, my wife and I are not members of that church. TBC doesn’t owe us a place to sit on Sunday morning. Furthermore, TBC is aware that I was disfellowshipped from RSBC. Biblically speaking, through the church discipline process, RSBC has declared that I am not Christian and handed me over to Satan. TBC is recognizing that.

“If your brother sins, go and show him his fault in private; if he listens to you, you have won your brother. But if he does not listen to you, take one or two more with you, so that by the mouth of two or three witnesses every fact may be confirmed. If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector. Truly I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall have been bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall have been loosed in heaven.” Matthew 18 15-19

“For I, on my part, though absent in body but present in spirit, have already judged him who has so committed this, as though I were present. In the name of our Lord Jesus, when you are assembled, and I with you in spirit, with the power of our Lord Jesus, I have decided to deliver such a one to Satan for the destruction of his flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus.” 1 Corinthians 5 3-5

I had to explain to an RSBC Deacon who called me last week that he had declared that I was not a Christian through his participation in the church vote. This was lost on him. It’s not lost on TBC. Even though the church baptized me, TBC is under no obligation to recognize me as a Christian. However, this raises the question, should a church ban a certain non-Christian from its worship services? I have no criminal record and no history of violence, there is no reason to believe that people need to be physically protected from me. I have never interrupted a worship service. TBC would be well within reason to deny me communion and refuse an application from me for church membership, at least not without further investigation into the incident at RSBC. In my case, I was not seeking membership at Tabernacle, just a place to be gathered on Sunday morning. I was denied this. I wasn’t asking for recognition or Christian fellowship, just a place to sit from 11 to 12 on Sunday morning.

Members of Tabernacle Baptist Church need to ask themselves the following question

“Do we want someone who needs to hear the word of God proclaimed sitting in our pew on Sunday or do we want to be the kind of church who tells this person not to come back?”

Tabernacle Baptist Church doesn’t owe my family anything. Still, I think it is making a very bad decision. If it was up to me, I’d love my neighbor by giving him a place to sit and hear the Bible proclaimed on Sunday. That’s what everybody needs, even gentiles and tax collectors. I wouldn’t turn someone who wanted to sit peacefully in my church building away.

Tabernacle turned me away.

Such is the blackball. This is the kind of thing I knew could happen if I stood up against Masonry. It’s a powerful network. I stood up anyway. No network is more powerful than the God I serve. When it comes down to it, I will not assent to the idea that I committed the nebulous sin of “sowing discord” because I wouldn’t put up with a demonic cult being part of God’s Holy assembly.

And I never will.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use

Testimony: A Former Mason Comes Clean About the Lodge

The following testimony was submitted by former Masonic Worshipful Master, Daniel Latham.  Please pray for Daniel, who may face backlash for sharing insider truth about Freemasonry.

“For some of those guys it’s not just a way of life., they live it and breath it.” Daniel Latham

My name is Danny Latham, I am a Christian, I currently attend at a Southern Baptist Church in Northern Kentucky and I am a veteran of the United States Army.  I am the former Worshipful Master of Golden Rule Covington Lodge #109.  However, I am no longer a Freemason.  When I got saved, I had to choose between the Lord and the Lodge, I chose the Lord.

I grew up in a low-income blue collar family. My father walked out on my mother and I, when I was six months old. Depending on who you ask, he either left me on a bed by myself with a bottle, or my mother would not let him see me. Either way, he left and I did not see him again until I was sixteen.  My mom ended up marrying my step-father who was a drunk; he was abusive both physically and mentally. Needless to say, I did not feel any love in my house. My Granny was one of the few Godly women I ever knew.  She told me about God’s love but the “love” I knew at home from “father figures” made me suspicious of this so-called love of God the Father.  God could keep his love as far as I was concerned.

I was a punk kid and that is an understatement. I was sexually assaulted by a friend of the family, when I was ten and she was thirteen. The abuse continued, unwilling, for a few years until puberty hit me.  Then it continued willingly, at about age fifteen I met a thirty-eight-year-old woman; she was a boss at my job.  She gave me attention and, one night, she gave me her love, but it was only the bodily kind. I got suspend and expelled from school for fighting, drugs, and general misbehavior. I was even a ward of the state for a few months; you can say I knew a hard life. I met my now wife when I was sixteen.   By that time I was living on my own (i.e. couch-surfing). She showed me real love; for the first time in my life someone wanted me for me and not my sexual organs. Somehow, I managed to con my way through the rest of high school and graduated at the bottom of my class as the father of a two-year-old child.

After graduation, I enlisted in the Army.  At my first duty station my NCO (non-commissioned officer) asked me if I went to church. I told him that I had gone a few times; I think I even made up a few stories about a chaplain and the sinners prayer. He did not buy it, so I went to church with him.  They were speaking in tongues and rolling on the floor! I freaked out and ignored everything going on.  The next day at work he asked me to keep coming. In the Army our NCOs are very powerful.  Make them mad and your career can take a nose dive. I kept going to his church and even brought my wife and daughter.  Eventually, I was sent to another unit with my kind of people- drunks. I was around twenty at this time.

By 2009, I was out of the Army and working in civilian life.  One of my colleagues happened to be a Freemason and Baptist. Around this time, I was still doing all the things one should not be doing, but my co-worker piqued my curiosity about Freemasonry.  The Army was full of Christian Freemasons and they were powerful. If anyone crossed them, their promotions were messed up and they got put on terrible details.  The Masons in the army could and would make the life of anyone who crossed them miserable. I figured, “Well, I can use that kind of power to get myself into a nicer, cushier job”. So, I asked my colleague if I could join his Lodge and things took off from there. This Lodge had really nice guys in it, lots of Christians.  It also had lots of guys like me, atheistic and worldly.  They  loved to chase women and rum and I loved it, too.  I was hooked, desiring the type of power and influence these men had.

My first visit with the Masons came from an investigation committee, they come out to a candidate’s house to meet his family ask him three general questions. The committee stressed to me that believing in a higher power was key.  At the time, rum and lots of soft curvy women were god to me. So that’s what I told them my “higher power” was.  They laughed at it, including the Christian Deacon!  I figured, “Well if a Christian is with my God then great!” I was soon initiated into the Lodge.  During my initiation ceremony there were lots of allusions to God.  One of the questions was, “In times difficulty and danger in whom do you place your trust?” the answer is supposed to be “God”. I answered, “The God of tits and rum”, they laughed, I laughed and we had a good old time. After my blindfold or as they call it “hoodwink” was removed, I received the Great Light lecture and the Bible lecture. As I went through the degrees and the officer chairs (“going through the chairs” is a Masonic term for working your way up to Worshipful Master), it became obvious that Hiram Abiff was the Messiah of the Masonic Lodge. It didn’t make a difference to me, we Masons taught that everyone was going to the “Celestial Lodge”.  Who cares if they have a fake Jesus? The real one was just as fake as Hiram! Around December of 2016, I was tapped to be the Worshipful Master, the king in the lodge.

At the time, I was big time into conspiracy theories, which was another reason for me to go through the first three degrees of Masonry and then the thirty-two degrees of the Scottish Rite.  As I went down the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories, I came across a message board that had short stories on it. One of the stories that caught my eye was Christian in nature, my Granny’s type of Christianity, not the brothers in the Lodge’s type.  I messaged a friend of mine and sent him the stories, he sent me a video and it all clicked. I was not going to that Celestial Lodge! I was not a good person, and all the good deeds I was doing at the Lodge did not mean anything to God! The one true God, the Great I Am, The Alpha and Omega, the God of Abraham, Isaiah, and Jacob, the God who had had sent his Son, the one true Messiah, to die in my place for my many sins was not the god of the Lodge.  I was stunned by this video and the evidence therein that the Bible was true. I knew I could no longer ignore the gospel truth, I cried, and cried. Tears for a man was the kiss of death, the way I was raised anyway, I cried for at least 3 months.

In March of 2017 I opened the Lodge meeting for the first time as a Christian and a Mason. I knew these 2 things were incompatible and one had to go, I choose Jesus. In April, I went to an officer’s meeting and announced my resignation.  It did not go well, but the deist and or agnostic brothers were easier on me than the Christian Masons. They deists and agnostics wished me well and said that they hoped I would come back to the Lodge.  It was the Christian brothers that gave me a hard time. They argued that Masonry and Christianity were compatible. They said I could do both.  They said the Lodge had nothing to do with the salvation that Christ offered. They had some good arguments, yet I still could not shake that feeling I did not belong in the Lodge.  I was truly free for the first time in my life. I attempted to get the others who claimed to be Christians to leave.  They all stayed, one is now the Worshipful Master.

Brothers and Sisters Freemasonry and Eastern Star is chocked full of the occult. The Master Mason degree, in that portion of the ritual known as the Legend of the Third Degree, there are three central characters. The story line is set around the building of Solomon’s temple. The characters, King Solomon, Hiram – the King of Tyre, and Hiram Abiff are all taken from the Scriptural account of the temple building. King Solomon and Hiram King of Tyre are mentioned many times in the Scriptures, such as in 1 Kings 5. About the closest the Scriptures come to Hiram Abiff is Huram-Abi which is found in 2 Chronicles 2:13 in the NAS and NIV translations. Huram is a variant of Hiram. In the KJV translation of the verse, the name Hiram is found. The KJV uses both Huram (2 Chron 2:3) and Hiram (1 Kings 5) to identify Hiram the King of Tyre. The KJV translation of 2 Chron 2:13 does not contain -abi, but rather “Huram my father’s.” The Hebrew word from which the KJV “fathers” was translated is “‘ab,” according to the Hebrew Dictionary found in Strong’s Concordance. Strong’s entry for the word ‘ab (H1) indicates that it can also mean father-less, as the son of a widow would be. The entry for H1 also mentions “Abi-.” Studying the various translations along with a Hebrew dictionary allows us to see how Freemasonry may have settled on the name Hiram Abi-ff, also sometimes spelled Abif.

Hiram King of Tyre wrote a letter to King Solomon, advising him that he was sending Huram-Abi to work on the temple. That letter is documented in 2 Chron 2:11-14. The fact that Hiram-Abi was the son of a widow of the tribe of Naphtali is confirmed in Scripture:

“King Solomon sent to Tyre and brought Huram, whose mother was a widow from the tribe of Naphtali and whose father was a man of Tyre and a craftsman in bronze. Huram was highly skilled and experienced in all kinds of bronze work. He came to King Solomon and did all the work assigned to him.” 1 Kings 7:13-14

Although the most important element of Masonic symbolism deals with the death, burial and resurrection of Hiram Abiff, there is nothing in Scripture to support it. Masonic Grand Lodges have stated that the account is not based upon fact, but rather is an allegory, used to teach.  How many times have you Masonic readers sat through a legends degree? How many times have you seen Hiram raised from the “dead” to speak the Master Masons replacement word of “MaH-Ha-Bone?” How many times have you seen the Holy Bible opened next to a Koran or other “Godly” Book? How many times have you heard others speak and say, “In here we are all brothers, religion does not matter, we are all going to that celestial body?”  Brothers it’s a fraud, Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” John 14:6 ESV. He doesn’t say, “Your Good deeds plus me” He said “I, I, I.” That means Jesus and only Jesus. While I was a Mason, I did a great deal of good things.  I raised money for schools and the poor. We all have done that right? None of that means anything without Jesus, Ephesians 2:8-10 ESV states this “For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.”  We are nothing without the Lord, brothers I implore you seek Jesus, leave your lodges as many others are doing.

[Edited by: Seth Dunn]

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use