$19,274.49 – What War Room Stands to Make off of your Church

On the eve of the release of War Room, I have written this piece to accompany my earlier review of that film.  This article includes a listing of War Room’s many companion products, which have been made available through LifeWay Christian Resources.   War Room has been heavily promoted by LifeWay representatives throughout the United States.  Local Baptist missions association directors, in conjunction with LifeWay representatives, have encouraged churches to purchase blocks of tickets or even rent out entire theatres for showings of War Room.  During the past few months, free previews of the movie have been offered to key leaders in local churches in order to create a buzz for the film.  Tomorrow War Room will hit theatres.   Its many companion products should appear at a church near you shortly thereafter.

There are two primary products which have been made available for sale to churches:

  • A Church Campaign Kit – $34.99
    • This kit includes a leader guide for planning a War Room themed Bible Study. It also includes Sermon outlines so that pastors can preach the theme of War Room from their pulpits.
    • According to the product description, the Campaign Kit can “create awareness and re-introduce your church to the power of prayer.” It can also “Encourage participation in War Room (whatever that is) among church members.”
  • The War Room Bible Study – $24.99 for the Leader Kit and $7.99 for participant study books.
    • This five-lesson study claims to assist users to “Develop strategies to battle the real Enemy through prayer.” (Read Bible, fold hands, close eyes, talk to God.  That will be $7.99, please)

War Room Products

Other products include a teen prayer journal, a “Battle Plan” prayer journal (which seems to be little more than a regular prayer journal which has been branded for the movie), the War Room novel, and the “Battle Plan for Prayer” book by Alex and Stephen Kendrick which is advertised as a “strategic guide to engaging with God, expecting His answers, and enlarging your vision of what He can do through someone like you.”

This product line doesn’t sit right with me.  Certainly, toy companies aren’t sinning when they make Ninja Turtle and Transformer Action figures to accompany movies about those characters.  Neither does Disney sin when it sells princess dolls of all its movie heroines.  These companies are just doing what companies exist to do, selling products to make a profit.  So, it’s not unusual to see a product line associated with a movie.  However, unlike Star Wars action figures, the gospel and biblical principles are not commodities.  Yet, there are so many things for sale in association with War Room.

Doesn’t it seem a little McChurch to offer sermon outlines for sale?  Shouldn’t a local pastor already be equipped to preach on prayer from the Holy Bible?  Does the local pastor need to spiritually lead his flock to the cineplex?

Coast to coast, local churches have been asked to give War Room a major push in theaters.  Some churches are planning to buy block of tickets to sell or give to their members.  If the movie is good, couldn’t consumers make the choice to buy tickets of their own volition?  (Does your church tell you what brand of groceries to buy?)  There is a clear message from the Evangelical Industrial Complex Associated with this movie: “You will see it.  You will study it.  Your church will buy the companion materials.  We decide what’s cool and its War Room.”

Consider a church with 1,000 active adult members.  If the church buys a campaign kit,  fifty Sunday School leader guides, one thousand study books, and one thousand movie tickets, the total cash outlay for doing so will be somewhere in the neighborhood of $19,274.49 and War Room will be the in thing at the church for five weeks.

Price

Could that money be better spent elsewhere, missions perhaps, perhaps hiring a youth minister who knows how to do more than play electric guitar and throw pizza parties?

Of course, most churches aren’t one thousand members strong but many are.  Some are even bigger.  There are thousands of churches, from as small as 50 to as large 10,000 who are currently in the market for War Room tickets and materials.  These materials have been pushed on them hard by their local missions directors and LifeWay representatives.  The potential companion product revenue that surrounds this movie is staggering.

Companion Products

Companion product revenue is needed because the evangelical movie market is a small one when compared to the general population.  This is not a movie lost people, by and large, are going to go out and see.  They will spend their money on rated R fare while the clear gospel presentation in War Room is preached to the choir.  So, to convince secular movie distributors such as Tri-Star to invest in their movies, Christian Filmmakers must promise to deliver ticket sales and related revenue.  Blocks of church-bought tickets will do just that, especially on their movie’s opening weekend.

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Alex Kendrick seems to have become the Tyler Perry of the Christian movie industry.  He writes movies, stars in them, and markets them to his niche audience.  Again, there’s nothing sinful about doing this but I remember his first few movies and he didn’t seem like media mogul back then.  Flywheel and Facing the Giants were made as ministry of his church and even starred church members, not professional actors.  Now, he’s resigned from his church to run his own production company.  Personally, I can’t imagine a 1st Century pastor leaving his church to produce and market Christian drama.  Neither can I imagine a 1st century Christian being a gospel consumer.  I certainly can’t imagine a 1st century Christian associating with the likes of TD Jakes and other Word of Faith Ministers but that’s exactly who Kendrick has been keeping company with since hitting the big time.

The gospel is a big time message but it’s not a big time product.  Be discerning about War Room.  Don’t be afraid to question the leadership of your church if they expect you to study it.  As I mentioned in my review, there are serious and well-document problems with the people associated with this film: most notably Priscilla Shirer and Beth Moore (who is actually barely in the movie at all).  Both have advocated the dangerous practice of contemplative prayer.  Now, they are starring in a movie about prayer which is selling books about prayer.  Does the guy at your church buying blocks of movie tickets know this?

Be careful Christians.  Consumers usually get what they pay for.  Maybe this weekend you should find a copy of Flywheel and sit down with your family at home and watch it.  When it’s over, read the Bible and pray together.  That will cost a lot less than $19,274.49.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

5 Verses That Prove the Bible Supports Abortion Rights?

Recently a friend sent me an article entitled 5 Verses that Prove the Bible Supports Abortion Rights.   My friend, who was taken aback that the article had been written at all and then shared on Facebook (where he saw it) stated, “The whole world is going absolutely insane.  I thought the whole ‘choose your gender’ trend was asinine, but now they are actually trying to argue that the Bible supports abortion… The evil in this world is growing by the day.”  I agree with my friend.  I also understand that what he was really saying to me was, “Seth, since it’s you thing, write a blog article refuting this garbage.”   I’m happy to oblige.  The idea that the Bible supports abortion rights is absolute nonsense.

The author of the article, Curtis Fiers, appears to completely lack an understanding of how to properly understand and apply Scripture.  Ironically, Fiers wrote that pro-life individuals, when arguing from the Bible that abortion is murder are, “simply taking verses and twisting them to imply that abortion equals killing a human.”  The misapplication of scriptures in which Fiers engaged demonstrates not only what twisting scripture actually looks like but also a general ignorance of biblical history and culture.

Exodus 21 and the Unborn

The first passage that Fiers cited to make his case is Exodus 21:22-25.  According to Fiers this verse “lays out the penalty for causing a woman to miscarry and it’s just a fine.”  Fiers quoted the scripture as follows:

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There is a conspicuous absence of the specific English translation of the Bible which Fiers cited.  I googled the phrases “when men have a fight and hurt a pregnant woman” and “so that she suffers a miscarriage” and I could not find the exact wording that Fiers provided.  The closest match I could find to Fiers’ wording was that of the NABRE translation.  This translation uses the English term miscarry to translate the Hebrew term yatsa. More popular translations such as the ESV, NASB, KJV, HCSB, and NKJV do not translate the Hebrew term thusly.  This Hebrew term, according to Strong’s Concordance, means “to go or come out.”  It does not necessarily denote what modern English people would understand as a miscarriage.  As John Piper noted in his own analysis of this verse, there is a Hebrew verb, shakal, that is properly understood to mean miscarry.  This very term is used in the twenty-third chapter of Exodus to communicate the concept of miscarriage.  It is not used in the verse cited above, without translation reference, by Fiers.  A more in-depth treatment of the proper translation of Exodus 21 can be found at Chrisitan Apologist Greg Koukl’s website.

Students of bible translations and church demographics know that most evangelical Christians, the type of people most likely to deny that abortion rights exist, do not use Bible translations that translate the Hebrew term yasta as miscarry.  Some of those who Fiers accuses of “twisting scripture” likely unaware of translations that use the English term miscarry to translate yatsa.  Such translations are in the minority of the body of biblical translations.  One such translation is the NRSV.  This translation is popular among mainline Christians, who are more likely than their evangelical counterparts to take a pro-choice position on legalized abortion.  Mainliners are also more likely to deny the inerrancy of scripture.  Those who accept the inerrancy of scripture (i.e. who actually believe the Bible is true) use translations such as the ESV, NASB, and NIV.

Evangelical Christians are much more likely to be familiar with Exodus 21 wording such as this (from the latest edition of the NASB):

“If men struggle with each other and strike a woman with child so that she gives birth prematurely, yet there is no injury, he shall surely be fined as the woman’s husband may demand of him, and he shall pay as the judges decide. But if there is any further injury, then you shall appoint as a penalty life for life,  eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot,  burn for burn, wound for wound, bruise for bruise.”

This wording indicates that a woman’s stress can cause her to go into premature labor but not cause injury to her or her child.  If such is this case, the offender may be fined by her husband for the hardship caused.  The baby, in this situation survives.  If there is injury, either to child or mother, the offender’s life is forfeit.  This verse is often cited by Christians to give biblical support that preborn life is valued by God.  It’s easy see why.

Even if one grants that Fiers’ minority translation of miscarry is the correct one, Exodus 21 does not “prove” that the Bible supports abortion rights.  Quite the opposite is the case.  The situation in question is not an elective abortion but an accidental miscarriage caused by a fight.  The father, not the mother, has the right to demand a fine from the offender.  In the modern American context, pro-choice people support a woman’s right to choose.  In the biblical context, as Fiers cites it, a mother doesn’t even have the right to demand a fine for the accidental loss of her unborn baby.  Her husband does.  Furthermore, there is no right to abort the child.  The one who caused the miscarriage is fined.  If one has a right to do something, then the government has no right to fine him for it.  Even if yatsa is understood to mean “miscarry” it indicates that there is some value, though less than that of an adult, to unborn life.  Even in modern legal systems human life is valued differently.  The wrongful death of a thirty year old attorney will command a greater civil legal penalty than the wrongful death of a ninety year old retired janitor with advanced Alzheimer’s. The young lawyer’s family will be owed more compensation by the one who committed the tort because their loved one had a greater potential to provide income for his family than did the retired janitor.  Both wrongly killed people are human.  Both are alive.  Both had their property rights violated by an offender.  The penalty for doing so, however, is different.  So, too, would be the case in Exodus 21.  A husband would have invested heavily in supporting his adult wife.  He would have invested little in supporting his unborn child.  Thus, the civil penalty for killing each one is different.  Consider the nature of civil torts; negligence is factor in the severity of the penalty for a tort. Consider criminal infractions, involuntary manslaughter carries a tougher penalty than first degree murder.  Such factors come into play in the Old Testament law.

In using an inaccurate translation to argue that Exodus 21 supports abortion rights, Fiers errs.  It’s one thing to use a wrong translation and arrive at a wrong conclusion.  It’s another to fail to exercise proper logic and legal reasoning altogether.  Fiers does both.  Exodus 21 does not support abortion rights under any circumstances.

Ecclesiastes 6 and Life not Worth Living

The second passage Fiers cite to make his case in Ecclesiastes 6.  However, in the case of this verse Fiers cites the KJV.

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It’s worth noting that the KJV renders Exodus 21:22 as follows:

“If men fight and hit a pregnant woman and her child is born prematurely, but there is no serious injury, he will surely be punished in accordance with what the woman’s husband demands of him, and he will pay what the court decides.”

The KJV does not support the rendering of the Hebrew term yasta as miscarry.  It indicates premature birth.  It appears that Fiers used whatever Bible translation best suited his purposes.  The NABRE, which Fiers previously cited uses renders the Ecclesiastes text born dead rather than untimely birth.  In any case, this passage is not talking about an elective abortion but deeply tragic occurrence, a still birth.  In reference to this verse, Fiers makes two claims, “the Bible literally says it’s better to die in the womb than live an unhappy life. This flies directly into the face of all anti-choice believers.”

The first claim is true.  The bible does literally say that.  However, it does not literally mean that.  The translation Fiers chose to present this verse is ultimately irrelevant because he failed to first understand the genre of the biblical book itself.  Ecclesiastes, like Job, Psalms, and Proverbs, is ancient Near Eastern literature.  It’s of a poetic genre.  It’s not always mean to be taken literally.  For example, Psalm 50:10 says that’s God owns “the cattle on a thousand hills.”  Psalm 50:10 verse does not literally mean that are exactly one thousands hills upon which are cows owned by God.  It means that God owns lots and lots of cows, all of them in the whole world in fact.  In its entirety, Psalm 50:10 (NASB) says:

“For every beast of the forest is Mine, The cattle on a thousand hills.”

Ancient Near Eastern poetry will often compare or contrast two things.  This verse compares wild animals with domestic animals. It does not indicate that God owns all the wild animals but only one thousand domestic cows.  It means, that God owns all of the animals in the entire world (Psalm 24 says the same thing in a more direct way).

Ecclesiastes 6 poetically makes use of hyperbole.  In the ancient Israelite world the birth of a child was an occasion for great joy.  The still birth of a child was an occasion for great sorrow.  (For those in the modern world who don’t murder their babies in the womb, this still holds true.)  In the ancient world, one who had many children was understood to be protected in his old age.  In the days before social security and 401(k)s one depended upon one one’s children for support when he got old and infirm.  Fathering “a hundred children” would be seen a great blessing.  It should also be seen as great hyperbole.  Almost no one who has ever read this piece of poetry has literally fathered one hundred children.  This piece of poetry compares a superlatively happy thing (having lots of children and living many years) with a superlatively sad thing (dying at birth).  It uses hyperbole to make its primary point; that a life lived without a satisfied soul is a tragic one.  Material blessing pales in comparison to spiritual blessing; this is the over arching message of Ecclesiastes.

Ecclesiastes does not fly directly in the face of pro-life people.  It does quite the opposite.  It supports the worldview that new life is precious and is to be celebrated.  This is the worldview presupposed by writers of the biblical text.  Furthermore, even if Fiers was correct and this text literally meant that it was better to die at birth than live an unhappy life, it would still not support elective abortion rights.  No one aborting a 12-week-old unborn baby knows with any certainly that the child will live a good or a bad life.  History provides examples of poor children who went on to lead productive and happy lives.  It also provides examples of rich children who went on to lead morose lives.  Only God knows how any given life will turn out.  Furthermore, people subjectively define happiness.  Some people are fine with being poor and having little.  Some people are more materialistic.  No one can predict the value system of a 12-week-old unborn child.  No one, then, can electively abort a child for her own good.  It’s impossible to ask a dead child if he would have liked to live.  There is only one God and the abortionist is not Him.

Numbers 3 and the Beginning of Life

The third verse cited by Fiers to make his case is from Numbers 3. Fiers didn’t so much disregard genre in his application of this verse.  He disregarded context, theology, and culture.

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According to Fiers, since the Lord did not order Moses to count males who were under one month old, those children might not “hold a human value”.  This would contradict the pro-life position that human life begins at conception.  However, there could be other reasons that Moses was not required to count Levites boys less than a month old.

The Jews went by a lunar calendar and a lunar month is 29.5 days.  In ancient Israelite culture, a woman was ceremonially unclean for forty days after giving birth to a male child.  She was unclean even longer if she bore a female child.  It wouldn’t be proper for a census taker to approach an unclean woman to count her infant and check the baby’s gender.  Furthermore, infant mortality rates were much higher in the ancient Middle Eastern wilderness than they are today.  Today, babies born in hospitals who have trouble latching to their mother’s breast can be fed with synthetic formula and given modern medical care.  Such babies died three thousand years ago.  It may not have been reasonable to count babies for a census until after the odds of their continued viability increased.  This doesn’t’ mean that babies under one month old didn’t hold a human value.  Fiers apparently didn’t take these conditions into consideration.  Nor, did he take into consideration the reason for the census.  This is not the only census in the Bible nor is it the only one in the book of Numbers.  In Numbers 26 a census of all males over twenty years old (fighting age) is ordered.  Would Fiers argue that those under twenty years old don’t hold human value?  Taking this census out of context, as he does the census of Numbers 3, he could.  Additionally, would Fiers take this passage to mean that females don’t hold human value?  Females aren’t counted at all.

Genesis 2 and Breath

Fiers ultimately did not buy his own argument from Numbers 3.  However, he rejects it only because of a misapplication of Genesis 2.

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Referencing this verse, Fiers asked, “If Adam, the first human to ever exist, had to take a breath before being considered a living soul, why is the same not true for unborn fetuses?”  Fiers misses the point of this passage entirely.  In the greater context of Genesis, many living things are created (animals, birds, fish, etc…).  In contrast to all other living things, mankind is presented as a special creation of God.  Mankind is made in God’s own image.  This text is translated “And the Lord formed man” and not “And the Lord formed Adam” for a reason.  The Hebrew term for man is adam.  When the text is translated Adam, it is because it refers specifically to first individual man God created.  When the text is translated man, it is because it refers to mankind in general.  So, not only does Genesis 2:7 refer to the creation of the specific man, Adam, it also refers to the creation of mankind as a whole.  Unlike other animals, man became a living soul because God breathed life into him.  The concept of special creation holds significance in this verse.  This verse does not refer to any kind of formula that requires one to take a breath of oxygen through his lungs in order to be considered a human soul.  Genesis is not a medical textbook; it is a theological account of history.  It should be read and understood thusly.

Adam was inanimate dust.  He was made human by the breath of God.  He then fathered children with his wife.  These children were not formed from the dust of the ground but from the coming together of Adam and Eve.  They, like all humans who are born of their parents, are human because they come from humans.  Dogs make dogs.  Cats make cats.  Humans make humans.

 Numbers 5 and the Test of Fidelity

The last passage Fiers cited to make a pro-abortion case from scripture is Numbers 5:27. Fiers cites this passage as his Coup de grâce against pro-life Christians.  This passage describes what is known as “the trial of jealousy”.

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Analyzing this scripture, Fiers writes, “If the woman has cheated and is carrying another man’s child…the mystical dirt water…will cause her to immediately miscarry…So even if pro-lifers can dodge all these other verses, they can’t deny that this one essentially says, ‘Abortion is okay as long as it’s forced upon a woman, against her will, for cheating on her husband.’

I can and I do.

Again, Fiers is off base.  Even in a hypothetical world where his case is true, this verse doesn’t indicate that women have the right to have an elective abortion.  This verse would indicate that if a husband thinks he has been cheated on and if his wife truly has conceived a child by doing so, then he can choose to bring her before a priest to drink a certain concoction prepared by the priest.  If and only if the wife has been unfaithful will she miscarry.  The child dies, not by the election of a man, but by the supernatural action of God.  There is no abortion clinic, back alley or in a hospital, on earth with a Jewish priest who is empowered by God to concoct the drink required for the trial of jealously and then perform that right.  If Fiers thinks this is way to obtain a moral abortion, I encourage him to have at it.  Of course, neither he nor anyone else will be able to under the New Covenant.

Still, Fiers’ case is wrong.  He once again played the translation switching game.  This time, Fiers has chosen to cite the NIV.  This in itself is interesting in that he previously cited literal translations where as the NIV translation committee strove to render textual meaning without a word-for-word translation.  It is not a popular version for scholarly study in any denomination, liberal or protestant. It is likely that Fiers cited the NIV because it is one of the rare translations that uses the English term miscarry into this passage.  Most translations do not.  For example, the NASB renders this passage:

“When he has made her drink the water, then it shall come about, if she has defiled herself and has been unfaithful to her husband, that the water which brings a curse will go into her and cause bitterness, and her abdomen will swell and her thigh will waste away, and the woman will become a curse among her people.”

This language does not indicate a miscarriage but bareness.  (Again, the Hebrew term for miscarriage, shakal, is not used.)  Because children we so valued, bareness was seen as a curse among the ancients.  This passage does not indicate the miscarriage of a baby but the destruction of a woman’s ability to reproduce at all.  It also demonstrates the lengths that the Old Testament law went to protect women.  Regarding the trail of jealously, Old Testament scholar Paul Copan wrote:

“Let’s summarize the theme of this text. If a man suspected his wife of adultery, he could bring her before the priest to accuse her. In this case, two or three witnesses weren’t available (Deut. 17:6–7); the only “witness” was the husband’s suspicion that his wife had been cheating on him. Critics charge that this would have been a terrifying ordeal: a cheating wife’s abdomen would swell and her thigh would shrivel after drinking “the water of bitterness.” Critics raise the question, “Why couldn’t a woman bring her husband before the priest if she suspected that he was guilty of adultery?” As it turns out, critics have chosen a poor text to illustrate oppression of women. For one thing, consider the context, which gives us every reason to think that this law applied to men as well. Before and after this passage, the legislation concerns both men and women: “Israelites” (Num. 5:2 NIV), “a man or woman” (Num. 5:6), “a man or a woman” (Num. 6:2). It wasn’t just the husband’s prerogative to call for this special trial; the wife could as well. Second, this priestly court was actually arranged for the protection and defense of women, not to humiliate them before proud husbands or prejudiced mobs. This law protected women from a husband’s violent rage or arbitrary threat of divorce to get rid of his wife cheaply.4 And if the woman happened to be guilty, then she’d rightly be terrified by a supernatural sign affecting her body. In fact, as with the deaths of Ananias and Sapphira in the early church (Acts 5), the Israelites would have a sobering warning regarding God’s attitude toward adultery.”  (Copan, Paul (2011-01-01). Is God a Moral Monster?: Making Sense of the Old Testament God (pp. 104-105). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.)

I have my doubts that Fiers consulted the writings of Old Testament Scholars like Copan in making his “undeniable” case for abortion rights.

Taking the Butchers Word

There is an aphorism that says one can get a good look at a steak by sticking his head up a cow’s behind but it is better to take the butcher’s word for it.  I’ve written this piece to give you the butcher’s word for it.  Fiers is wrong, very wrong.  As one who has formally studied scriptures, I was able to identify the fallacies and misapplication in Fiers’ arguments before I drove 5 miles in my car (I read the story on my phone as I was leaving work).  Fiers’ article is truly one of the worse treatments of the biblical text that I’ve ever read.  I’d call it bush league, but that would insult the bush league.  It seems to me that Fiers’ article is either the result of remarkable ignorance or purposeful deception.  Given the political controversy of the abortion issue and Fiers’ selective use of scripture translations, deception seems to be the most likely conclusion.

One doesn’t have to be a Bible scholar to use basic Google skills to look up the context of these verses.  The John Piper and Greg Koulke articles I cited can be found with minimal effort (and they are better Bible scholars than am I).  If Fiers did any research to understand the other side of his argument, he almost certainly didn’t expect his readership to do so.  In this time of internet sound bytes and intellectual laziness, Fiers seems to have taken the opportunity to push his agenda on those who are too lazy to question it.  I think most Christians will reject his writing outright (as some have done in the comment section of his article).  I write this as one who truly believes that the Bible is true.  I want to accurately present what it teaches not matter what the outcome.  I don’t think that is Fiers’ motive.  I don’t think he believes the Bible to be true at all, at least not all of it.

I do and I urge you to study it and understand it.  In it are the words of life.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

40 Harmful Effects of Christianity – #19

“Therefore be on the alert, for you do not know which day your Lord is coming.” Jesus

This post is the nineteenth in a series that addresses a list of “40 harmful effects of Christianity” that originated on the American Atheists Facebook page and has since made its way around the internet. In this post, I examine the following “harmful effect” from the list:

Harmful Effect #19: People who believe the world is about to end neglect their education, are not financially responsible, and in extreme cases take part in mass suicides.

No Christian has any biblical reason to neglect his finances or education because he expects an imminent end of the world.  According to Jesus, as recorded in the gospel of Matthew, no one knows the hour when Lord is coming back.  Jesus clearly stated that when He returned people would be carrying out the activities of everyday life such as working and eating.  There is absolutely nothing in bible that encourages Christians to essentially give up on life in expectation of the Lord’s coming.  In fact, the opposite is true.  In his second epistle the Thessalonian church, Paul admonished the people of that church to work instead of idly waiting for the Lord’s return.

The clear biblical instruction for Christians to live a productive life has unfortunately been ignored, along with other clear biblical doctrines, by pseudo-Christian cults such as the Jehovah’s Witnesses.  This particular cult has falsely predicted the time of Christ’s return and discouraged higher education among its members.  However, their predictions have proven false.  So, too, have those of radio evangelist Harold Camping.  Camping falsely predicted the coming of Christ to occur in 2011.  At least one of Camping’s followers spent his life savings advertising Camping’s false prophecy.  After his prediction failed, Camping admitted that he sinned and erred in making an end of world prediction that clearly contradicted scripture.  Neglecting one’s education and finances are not harmful effects of Christianity but rather harmful effects of ignoring its clear teachings.

Similarly, mass suicides ignore the Bible’s clear teaching to cherish life.  Groups which have engaged in mass suicide are at best, as is the case with Jehovah’s Witnesses, pseudo-Christian.  Notable examples of such groups are the David Koresh’s Branch Davidians, Marshall Applewhite’s Heaven’s Gate, and the Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple.  Each of these groups was involved in some form of sexual deviancy, mysticism, messianic claims, or communism.  All of these things are antithetical to a biblical worldview.  Jesus Himself correctly predicted that, “…many will come in My name, saying, ‘I am the Christ,’ and will mislead many.”  Believers in false messiah’s who commit mass suicide do so outside of the body of Christ.

Not only does harmful effect #19 make a false claim about Christianity, it ignores the hopeless nihilism inherent in the atheistic worldview.  On naturalistic evolutionary models, human actions are determined and therefore morally meaningless.  There is no hope of life after death and no ultimate purpose in life.  Furthermore, the end of all human life can be anticipated in the Big Crunch, the eventual supernova of the Sun, or the universe’s inevitable heat death.  Such catastrophes, though millions of years from coming to pass, are essentially unavoidable.  In the short-term, calamities such as pandemic plague and global war threaten an immediate end to humanity and other forms of life.  On a multi-verse model of cosmology life is meaningless as well.  On such a model, every action a man takes, an alternate version of himself takes the opposite action.  This, too, robs a man of ultimate meaning.

On a Christian Worldview, actions are meaningful and hope abounds.  Mankind has been given dominion over the earth to work and learn.

When the Christian gets his reward, as song writer Jason Isbell puts it, he will sit “back in his chair beside the Father and the Son.”  Until that time, the Christian should heed the words of the Apostle Paul:

Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance. It is the Lord Christ whom you serve.”

In my next post in this series, I’ll address the following:

Harmful Effect #20: Long-term environmental issues ignored because of beliefs that the rapture/apocalypse or something will happen soon, so they don’t matter.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

God Has Enough Rocks – Are You Still Praying for America?

“Now when the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and behold, terror and great darkness fell upon him. God said to Abram, ‘Know for certain that your descendants will be strangers in a land that is not theirs, where they will be enslaved and oppressed four hundred years. But I will also judge the nation whom they will serve, and afterward they will come out with many possessions. As for you, you shall go to your fathers in peace; you will be buried at a good old age. Then in the fourth generation they will return here, for the iniquity of the Amorite is not yet complete.’” Genesis 15:12-16

Remember in Forest Gump when Jenny Curran came across the house of her youth, where she was terribly abused by her father?  She furiously threw rocks at the dilated structure before falling down in a tearful heap.  Her companion Forest remarked, “Sometimes I guess there just aren’t enough rocks.”

After Jenny died, Forest had her house demolished. Speaking over his departed wife’s grave, Forest remarked that his mother told him that “dying was a part of life.”

It is.  In the United States dying through abortion has ended the short lives of millions of American babies, legally, before their birth.  Make no mistake.  Be not confused.  These children were alive, and then they were dead.  Death is part of the aborted child’s live almost as soon as she has the chance to live.  American Christians live in a nation that allows millions of abortion deaths to occur.  Yet, not only are they allowed to occur happen, the Supreme Court of the land had declared that obtaining an abortion is a right with which the government cannot interfere.  Now, much to the shock of many, it’s been discovered that one of the nation’s most prominent abortion providers has been selling the human organs of aborted babies.  This has been revealed through video evidence.  This video evidence has been suppressed by court order.  That provider, Planned Parenthood, has for years received financial support from the federal government.  Those who support funding this organization, including the party that controls the Executive Branch of American government, claim that this support is an advocacy of social justice.  Killing the helpless and selling their parts is social justice in America.

Have Americans killed more innocent children than the Canaanites of Old Testament times whose iniquity was eventually deemed complete by God?  The population math is simple, they have.  American is a wicked place.  To make matters worse, it’s a wicked representative democracy.  The people of the United States rule themselves.  The people of the United States have ruled themselves into iniquity.  With regards to national morality, the country has passed the tipping point.

Are you praying for America to turn the corner back to morality?  If so, why?  The United States is Jenny Curran’s dilapidated house, where abuse has been unchecked for years.  Perhaps rocks and bulldozers in the form of God’s judgment are more likely than a great awakening.  I suggest praying for the souls of lost people rather than praying for societal renewal in a lost land.  A growing Christian population will serve as salt and light wherever its root is planted.

Remember, Christians, your citizenship is a heavenly one and it is for that country that you are to make appeals.  I encourage you to direct your intercession towards the saints. We should not weep in a powerless, sick heap like a victimized Jenny Curran.  In Christ, we are more than conquerors.  We are a chosen people, a royal priesthood.

Let’s act like it.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

A Management Accountant Examines Planned Parenthood’s Sale of Fetal Organs

“There are six things which the Lord hates,
Yes, seven which are an abomination to Him:
Haughty eyes, a lying tongue,
And hands that shed innocent blood,
 A heart that devises wicked plans,
Feet that run rapidly to evil,
A false witness who utters lies,
And one who spreads strife among brothers.”
Proverbs 6:16-19

I am a management accountant.  For at least eight hours a day, I see the world in terms of inputs, processes, outputs…and waste which is, unfortunately a part of almost any manufacturing process.  That’s why, when I heard that Planned Parenthood was engaged in selling the organs of aborted fetuses, I was not surprised.  Like any other manufacturer with an eye towards the bottom line, Planned Parenthood seeks to recycle the waste products that are generated from its business process.  Planned Parenthood manufactures dead babies.  Its input is a live preborn baby, its process is killing the child, and its output is a dead child.  Its output, strangely enough, is also its waste.  Again, thoughtful manufactures seek recycle their waste products in order to reduce expenses or, if they are really skillful, generate revenue.

This is common.

I used to work in the paper industry.  I once visited a large paper mill in Brunswick, GA which manufactured sheets of cellulose out of woodchips.  The input to produce the cellulose was logs.  The first waste product the logs created was bark, which had to be stripped before they could be processed into cellulose.  The bark was stripped from the logs, gathered, and burned to help power the plant.  Waste was recycled into energy.  After the bark was removed from the logs, they ground into woodchips.  The wood chips were then soaked into a chemical solution in order to isolate the paper fibers inside of them.  The result of this soaking transformed the chemical solution into a substance called “black liquor”.  The black liquor was also burned in the plant’s power plant to create energy.  Again, waste was recycled into energy.  In the case of the bark and the black liquor the mill saved money from not having to purchase alternative energy sources.  Furthermore, the mill did not have to incur the expense of disposing of the waste products of its manufacturing process.

The abortion mills of Planned Parenthood treat dead babies like paper mills treat bark and chemicals.  By selling the organs (hearts, livers, etc…) of dead babies, Planned Parenthood turns its waste product into a revenue stream.  This shrewd bit of business process management has shocked and surprised many who have watched a recently published video (embedded below) of a Planned Parenthood doctor and executive explaining the process.  It has not surprised me, however, because I understand how businesses view commodities and waste.  I also understand how abortionists view human life.

For years, women in this country have been conditioned by the abortion rights lobby that unborn babies are just tissue (not babies) that are essentially a part of a pregnant woman’s body.  A popular tagline if the abortion rights movement is “my body, my choice”.  The unborn child is not understood to be a separate human being with a separate body.  It’s no surprise, therefore, that an organization that is in the business of “removing unwanted tissue” from a woman’s body would have no qualms about selling that “tissue” on the open market.  Strangely enough, the legality of this practice has been called into question.  In the United States (according to the video posted above) it is illegal to sell human body parts.  Apparently, the organs of aborted babies are considered “human” body parts.  While it is legal to kill a human child (by medical and scientific standards unborn children are considered “human) in her mother’s womb, it is at the same time illegal to sell her human organs.  This is the moral logic of the abortion rights lobby.  “Abortion,” it is often said, “stops a beating heart.”  This is true.  It is legal to kill the human being with a beating heart in her mother’s womb but it is illegal to sell her heart.  I pray this video will be the Uncle Tom’s Cabin of the abortion industry.

I praise God that he does not think of human beings as a commodity as Planned Parenthood thinks of human organs.  Though his son Jesus Christ bought His church with a price, we are not viewed by our Lord as products to be bought and sold.  It is a horrible evil that women honor not God with their bodies and murder their own children through the heinous practice of abortion.  It is a horrible evil that the United States of America allows this to go on, over and against the wishes of many states, while funding Planned Parenthood and organizations like it.

It is righteousness that a Holy God will one day judge the quick and the dead for their sins.  I hope many will, like I have, repent of their sins and place their faith in Jesus Christ.  Judgment is coming to those who shed innocent blood, for it is a thing God hates.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

War Room: A Review of the Movie and the Industry Surrounding It

“Rejoice always. Pray without ceasing.  In all circumstances give thanks, for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus” 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

War Room is the latest offering from fraternal film makers Alex and Stephen Kendrick.  As is the case with their previous films, War Room is marketed to a Christian audience and written from an evangelical worldview.  The movie stars Priscilla Shirer and T.C. Stallings as Elizabeth and Tony Jordan, a married couple with one young daughter named Danielle.  Though the Jordans are materially prosperous (Tony is a pharmaceutical salesman and Elizabeth is a Real Estate Agent), their marriage is very unhealthy.  The couple argues over money, family relations, has an inactive sex life, and pays so little attention to Danielle that the young girl feels isolated and unloved. To make matters worse, Elizabeth has foul-smelling feet (which are used as a comedic device throughout the film)

The Plot

An old black woman, played by Karen Abercrombie, named Clara Williams befriends Elizabeth.  The Clara character is a stereotypical older evangelical black woman with a notably active prayer life.  Clara meets Elizabeth in the context hiring Elizabeth to sell her house.  The audience (and Elizabeth) later learn that Clara had been praying for God to send her someone to disciple and feels like Elizabeth is the answer to that prayer.  Clara learns from Elizabeth that her family only occasionally attends church.  Elizabeth rarely prays or reads the Bible; her Christian walk is lukewarm at best and she harbors animosity towards her husband and is constantly fighting him.  All the while Tony, who travels often for his high-pressure sales job, is tempted to stray into adultery by a flirtatious and beautiful business associate.  Tony’s Christian walk is apparently worse than his wife’s.  He is doing nothing to shepherd and lead his family as the man of the household.

Elizabeth accepts Clara’s offer for discipleship and they began meeting together.  Over time they develop a strong friendship.  Clara shows Elizabeth her “War Room” and advises her to stop trying to fight her own battles with her husband but rather let God do it.  Clara’s “War Room” is a literal prayer closet in her house.  She has several written prayers in the closet and spends regular time in it praying over them as well as reading scripture.  Elizabeth creates a prayer closet of her own (cathartically removing her many material possessions from it) and adopts Clara’s practice.  As her prayer life becomes more active, she is faced with (unseen) spiritual warfare from the demonic realm and faces an increasingly challenging marriage.  Elizabeth faces the challenges, in the mode of a submissive and prayerful wife, and (SPOLIER ALERT!!!) her family gets a happy ending.

Overall the movie is well-done, entertaining, and carries a positive and useful message.  It is a somewhat better-acted than earlier Kendrick Brothers films which often used church members of Sherwood Baptist rather than professional actors.  There is a good mix of humor and drama in the film.  In contrast to other Chrisitan movies which are hokey and unrealistic, the plot of War Room is very believable.  Many moviegoers will likely identify with the characters given that the temptations and situations they face are common to families and professionals.  Although the movie is as good as or better than other Kendrick Brothers films, those who have already seen the movie Fireproof may be a little disappointed in War Room.  The plots of these two movies are very similar.  In Fireproof, Kirk Cameron plays a man who puts his fate in God’s hands to save his troubled marriage.  Shirer essentially plays that same role from a female position in War Room.

Further disappointed will be ladies who buy a ticket hoping to see a lot of Beth Moore.  Although Beth Moore is listed as a featured star on the movie poster, her character is very minor.  Moore plays a woman named Mandy who works at Elizabeth’s real estate firm.  Moore has (what seemed to me like) less than two minutes of screen time over two scenes.  She has a few short lines about maritial relations and is shown only one time afterwards in a very brief cut scene.  Moore’s casting in this small role was obviously a ploy to sell tickets to Moore’s thousands of faithful followers and readers.

Positive Morals of the Story

The movie teaches several possible lessons.  The Jordans’ obsession with money and career was destroying the quality of their family life and making their daughter feel almost unwanted.  They had a bigger house and more possessions than they really needed but the people in it were neglecting each other.  Like many families, they did not spend enough time praying together and studying God’s word; this is remedied. Furthermore, Tony confesses and deals with his sins in a very head-on and penitent manner, seeking reconciliation with those whom he has wronged.  He also shows mercy to an enemy who has treated him harshly and becomes the kind of spiritual leader that his household needs.  Both Tony and Elizabeth are supported, throughout their trials, by Christian friends who seek to hold them accountable and positively influence their lives for Christ.  The movie reminds Christians of who they need to be: people who pray, care for others, and disciple others.  It also contains a clear gospel presentation.  (I was personally convicted while watching the movie in that I sometimes do not pray enough about the things that concern me.)

Concerning Elements

There are several concerning elements of the film that one may or may not notice if he is watching he movie uncritically:

  • In one scene a man attempts to mug Clara and Elizabeth at knifepoint. Clara rebukes the man “in the name of Jesus”.  This kind of word of faith proclamation may work in the movies (and sometimes even in real life depending on a mugger’s background or God’s provision), however, a young person emboldened by the prayer theme of the movie may very well end up being stabbed if she imitates Clara’s example in real life.  This type of subtle word faith proclamation may be lost on conservative Southern Baptist audiences but it will certainly be noticed by Pentecostals who go to see the movie.
  • In another scene, Elizabeth is praying over the scriptures while Tony is on a business trip and out to dinner with a temptress. Elizabeth prays from the scriptures the phrase “resist the devil and he will flee”.  She repeats this line of scripture a few times.  In real life, Shirer is a proponent of contemplative prayer, a practice in which the prayer focuses on clearing her mind a repeating a specific phrase (similar to a mantra).  Those who are not aware of the practice of contemplative prayer will probably not notice that this scene touches the borderline of that practice.
  • Liz later leaves her closet and loudly proclaims Jesus to be the Lord of her house. She rebukes the devil and claims that her joy comes from Jesus.  It is certainly true that the devil steals joy and joy should be sought from God and not worldly things.  However, this scene is also strongly reminiscent of word of faith proclamation and excitability.
  • During her proclamation of Christ’s Lordship over her home, Elizabeth tells the devil to “go back to Hell.” While it’s certainly reasonable to believe that this biblically illiterate character believes that the devil comes from or lives in Hell, this is not the case in truth.  It is not biblical to assert that the devil comes from Hell.  The notion that he does is a popular misconception and husbands should be sure to make sure that their wives and children are not confused by Elizabeth’s misstatement.
  • After Elizabeth is mugged, Tony acts ambivalent. Later he has something of a dream or vision in which he sees his wife being mugged.  As he walks closer to the mugging, he sees that the mugger looks just like him.  This vision leads him to find Elizabeth’s prayer closet and start towards the path of becoming a better husband and father.  Although symbolism is common in cinematic art, some people may be uncomfortable with the portrayal of this kind of charismatic activity as a plot point.
  • A retired pastor buys Clara’s house towards the end of the film. He somehow senses that her “War Room” has been used as a prayer closet and decides then and there to purchase the home.  It is not biblical to imply that certain rooms in a house are imbued with special prayer powers.  Prayer closets can be ideal because of the isolation that they provide the prayer, preventing outside distraction.  However, closets are not especially anointed places.  (I predict that there will be a movement in many churches after the movie is watched to create prayer closets, prayer journals, and other things featured in the movie.  I further predict that the paraphernalia to create these things will be offered for sale at LifeWay which is actively pushing the movie to local baptist associations.)

The Media Business

Unlike the Kendrick Brothers’ previous films, War Room was not produced by Sherwood Films.  Sherwood Films is a ministry of Sherwood Baptist Church in Albany, Georgia at which the Kendrick Brothers have been employed as associate pastors for the past few years.  Although the Kendrick Brothers are still active members of that church, they are not listed among its pastoral staff.   The Kendrick Brothers recently founded their own film company, Faithstep Films, which produced War Room.  Given that the Kendrick Brothers are now working for their own company, no longer producing movies while in the employ of Sherwood Baptist, they will likely be entitled to a greater share of the revenue from the films which they write and in which they act.

War Room stands to be one of the Kendrick Brothers’ most lucrative films.  Both ticket sales and movie-related book sales should be substantial.  The film is getting a heavy push from LifeWay Christian Resources. In association with the release of their movie, Fireproof, the Kendrick Brothers authored the best-selling book, The Love Dare.  In association with the release of their movie, Courageous, the Kendrick Brothers authored the best-selling book, The Resolution for Men.  It would be very surprising if individual Christians were not encouraged to set up their own “war room” prayer closets in their homes in the same way they were encouraged to take the “Love Dare” with their spouses and sign the “Resolution for Men” in front of their churches.  A companion book, probably about the power of prayer, will almost certainly be published by LifeWay, released in association with War Room, and marketed as Sunday School material for the vast network of Southern Baptist and Evangelical Churches to whom this movie is marketed.

With popular Christian media personalities Priscilla Shirer and Beth Moore attached to the War Room project, Kendrick Brother book sales may reach an all time high.  Shirer and Moore are well-known advocates of the controversial pseudo new-age practice of contemplative prayer.  This is disturbing in and of itself given that Shirer and Moore are popular bible teachers.  It is even more disturbing that these women are appearing as characters in a movie about the power of prayer.  Shirer has already written a popular book on prayer entitled He Speaks to Me: Preparing to Hear from God for which Beth Moore wrote the foreword.

It’s important to consider that War Room is not about Priscilla Shirer but rather the character she plays, Elizabeth Jordan.  It might not be prudent to avoid a movie simply because an actor who plays one of the characters has questionable religious beliefs.  For example, it’s not incumbent upon a Christian to avoid watching Top Gun or Mission Impossible because Tom Cruise is a Scientologist.  However, it would be prudent to avoid watching a movie in which Tom Cruise plays a Scientologist whose life is bettered by the practice of Scientology.  Shirer, who heretofore was not a professional actor, was almost certainly selected for the role of Elizabeth Jordan because of her popularity as a Christian author who writes and teaches on the subject of prayer.  Although the fictional Elizabeth Jordan does not advocate for contemplative prayer in War Room, the very real Priscilla Shirer does so in real life.

In addition to Moore and Shirer, Alex Kendrick has been keeping very suspicious company since he left the staff of Sherwood Baptist.   In March of 2015, Alex Kendrick was a featured speaker at the “Missions and Marketplace Conference” in Chicago, Illinois.  Among the featured speakers at the conference was well-known Word of Faith Oneness Pentecostal pastor and author, T.D. Jakes. Jakes produced the film version of the controversial heaven tourism book Heaven is for Real.  This book was notably derided as “fanciful” by International Mission Board President Dr. David Platt during one of his “Secret Church” events and eventually banned for sale by LifeWay Christian Resources.   T.D. Jakes is not only in the movie business himself but is well-connected with film magnate Tyler Perry.  Perry recently came to Jakes’ church, donated $1,000,000 and slayed Jakes in the Spirit.  Jakes may be a great connection for someone, like Alex Kendrick, in the movie industry, but his worldview is dangerous and unbiblical and he makes a lucrative living propagating it.

kendrick jakes

The Missions and Marketplace Conference  at which Kendrick and Jakes spoke was hosted by Dr. Bill Winston at the church he pastors, Living Word Christian Center.  Living Word Christian Center proudly proclaims on its website that it is a “Word of Faith, non-denominational, full gospel church.”  Alex Kendrick, who was formerly employed as a Southern Baptist Minister at a very conservative church somehow made his way to speak at a, primarily African-American, Christian business conference hosted in Chicago by a charismatic Word of Faith preacher that featured other prosperity gospel speakers.  Kendrick did so in the same year that he planned to release a move starring Priscilla Shirer, the daughter of African American megachurch pastor, Tony Evans.  Kendrick is apparently seeking to increase his ticket and book sales in the African American Christian market as the overall Christian market shrinks amidst growing American secularism.  To do so, he has made some very dangerous and even heretical associations.

The Kendrick Brothers have made very fine Christian movies in the past.  However, having stepped away from the ministry of Sherwood Films, the Kendricks have made a movie with very suspicious circumstances surrounding it.  Christian men would do well to make sure their families do not fall under the influence of the teachers with whom the Kendricks have associated themselves.  Avoiding War Room altogether would be a prudent action.  So, too, would carefully contrasting the positive parts of the movie’s message against the concerning ones to his family if one chooses to let them see it.

“But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition. For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” 1 Timothy 6:9-10

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

The Cooperative Program and the Road to Serfdom

The Cooperative Program and the Road to Serfdom

The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is the one of the largest Christian denominations in the world[1]; it is one which holds a biblically sound statement of faith.[2] The SBC is known far and wide for its emphasis on evangelical mission work and biblically conservative stance on social issues. Though the SBC is widely-known, many people know very little about its operations: how it is organized, how it is led, and how it is funded. For example, many Southern Baptists might be surprised to find out that the Southern Baptist Convention has no assets, no employees, owns no property, and only exists for two days a year.[3]  The Southern Baptist Convention itself is a yearly gathering of independent member churches. During this annual gathering (called a “convention”), member church representatives elect leaders to administer Southern Baptist causes on a day-to-day basis. These causes, which operate throughout year, are funded through the voluntary giving of independent member churches. The lion’s share of this funding comes through what is known as “Cooperative Program” giving. The Cooperative Program has served to fund Southern Baptist operations since 1925.[4] Unfortunately, the Cooperative Program is outmoded. To make matters worse, Cooperative Program monies are being used to fund initiatives, at a national level, that many Southern Baptist laypeople would find objectionable if they only knew about them. Cooperative Program giving arguably supports what has become a top-heavy, bureaucratic, politically-motivated, money-centered religiopolitical empire that is operated by a class of clerical elites who do not represent Southern Baptist interests at a grass roots label.  A number of factors, the chief of which may be ignorance, allow the situation to persist. The existence of this problem situation calls for a review of the history of the Cooperative Program, a survey of Southern Baptist entities, an analysis of the economic effectiveness and efficiency of the Cooperative Program, a biblical reflection on Southern Baptist Stewardship and ecclesiology, and, most importantly, a solution and call to action. The solution and call to action are both simple and locally-focused: local churches should support their preferred Southern Baptist denominational causes, if any, by giving around the Cooperative Program and directly to Southern Baptist entities and missionaries.

A New Deal: The Birth of the Cooperative Program

“What the Hoover Dam became to agriculture and industry in the southwestern United States, the Cooperative Program would become to Southern Baptists.  The same superlative evaluation made by President Roosevelt concerning the Hoover Dam is fitting for the Cooperative Program.”[5] Chad Owen Brand and David Hankins

“…people who are concerned about the economy need to take a closer look at history. We deserve something better than repeating the 1930s disasters…No matter how much worse things got after government intervention under Roosevelt’s New Deal policies, the party line was that he had to ‘do something’ to get us out of the disaster created by the failure of the unregulated market” Thomas Sowell[6]

The Southern Baptist Convention was created in 1845 for the purpose of “organizing a plan for eliciting, combining, and directing the energies of the whole (Baptist) denomination in one sacred effort for the propagation of the gospel.”[7]  This effort would require funding.  Until 1925, the Southern Baptist Convention largely financed its denominational enterprises through boots-on-the-ground fundraising efforts.    The representatives of these denominational enterprises would hit the road, like old-time Methodist circuit riders, and solicit individual SBC churches for financial support.   “Sunday by Sunday,  fund-raisers from seminaries and colleges, orphanages and hospitals, mission boards and benevolent organizations fanned out among the churches asking the faithful for help…the costs of raising the money sometimes approached 50 percent of the proceeds…churches were beleaguered by an endless stream of denominational representatives needing ‘pulpit time’ to make their appeals.”[8]  For example, a representative from the Foreign Mission board might solicit funds from a church in June.  In July, a representative from a seminary might solicit funds from the same church.  The mission board representative, by virtue of his earlier arrival, might receive more giving.  Conversely, the seminary representative might receive more giving by virtue of a superior speaking ability.  Such potentialities resulted in an unequal distribution of denominational giving.  “The more popular, or perhaps the swifter, received a disproportionate share of the earnings.”[9]  In order to ensure a more even distribution of denominational giving, the Cooperative Program was created.  The Cooperative Program created a central source of funding for SBC enterprises.  To do so, it became a central recipient of giving.  In a sense, the Cooperative Program was created to spread the wealth.

In their book, One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program and Southern Baptists, authors Chad Owen Brand and David E. Hankins liken the inception of the Cooperative Program in the 1920s to another “visionary plan”[10] plan of the Progressive Era.  This “visionary” plan was that of the construction of the Hoover Dam.  “(The) Hoover Dam was just the first prominent example of the state-directed and state-funded industrialization of the Pacific states…bringing the Far West much closer to the industrial policy of pre-and postwar Japan and rather distant from ‘the natural workings of the market.’”[11]  Upon his first glimpse of the Hoover Damn, English novelist J.B. Priestly remarked, “Here is the soul of American under socialism”[12]  The Hoover Dam, the construction of which was begun under the administration of Hebert Hoover and completed under that of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, epitomizes New Deal-era progressive socialism. The analogy drawn by Brand and Hankins between the Cooperative Program and the Hoover Dam, then, is an appropriate one because so, too, does the Cooperative Program.  The Cooperative Program, like the New Deal, is a product of 1920s-era centrally planned progressivism.  It collects wealth from a large body and puts it under the control of central decision makers, who presumably know how best how to redistribute it.  The progressive nature of their denominational financing program may seem surprising to modern-era Southern Baptists who are generally associated with conservative, free-market republican or libertarian leanings.[13]  However, progressive democrats dominated the Political landscape of the southern United States (which was and is Southern Baptist country) during the Progressive Era.[14]  In keeping with progressive thought, Southern Baptists of the time rejected the soliciting of funds by individual entities at individual churches in favor of a centralized means of collecting and spending (the Cooperative Program) managed by top-level bureaucrats.

Funding SBC Entities

“I believe in the Cooperative Program because it is the best means of mission support in the world.” Don Hattaway, Georgia Baptist Convention President[15]

“While Central Planning may no longer be a credible form of economic organization, it is clear that the intellectual battle for its rival-free market capitalism and globalization-is far from won.” Alan Greenspan[16]

“For years, (the Cooperative Program) made it possible for small churches to be a part of sending missionaries to distant countries and obscure parts of the United States…With improved communication, transportation, and technology, today’s small churches can easily be involved in mission causes around the world…the Cooperative Program now supports astronomical salaries for agency CEOs, maintenance of huge agency office buildings, and programs that are duplicated in state conventions, associations, and local churches.”[17]  Even though local churches no longer need the Cooperative Program to participate in world missions, many still fund it.  In doing so, they place their dollars in the hands of an oligarchy of elite power brokers.  “These leaders – some estimate their number to be about 35 – make many SBC decisions in restaurants and motel rooms long before motions are officially made on the floor of the annual Convention.  This small group of powerful leaders are the ones spending the money for more than 16 million Southern Baptists.”[18]  These elite central planners distribute Cooperative Program money that the SBC receives to four of six primary Southern Baptist causes: The International Mission Board, The North American Mission Board, six Southern Baptist Seminaries, and The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.  The remaining two causes, LifeWay Christian Resources and Guidestone Financial Resources are self-supporting.

 The International Mission Board

The International Mission Board (IMB) employs a force of thousands of missionaries all around the world.  As of 2004, “the number of missionaries was approaching 5,300.  These missionaries and overseas groups they work with started 21,000 new churches and baptized 600,000 in 2004.  The total 2004 budget of the IMB was $242,526,532[19].  Cooperative Program support provides about 35% of this budget while the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering for International Missions provides about 55 percent.”[20]   As of 2015, IMB budget has grown to $3,011,000,000.[21]  As of May 13, 2015, there were 4,743 missionaries on the field.[22]  IMB missionaries are expected to affirm the confession of faith of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The North American Mission Board

“Most Southern Baptists are completely clueless about how their denomination has supported its domestic mission efforts in the decades since World War II. This ignorance is not limited to the average layperson in the pew but is shared by most pastors as well…This reflects a widespread failure on the part of Southern Baptist leaders at the national, state, association, and local church levels to do meaningful missions and stewardship education…” Glen A Land[23]

The North American Mission (NAMB) board is the domestic counterpart of the International Mission Board.  “In conjunction with the Baptist state conventions, NAMB supports approximately five thousand missionaries in North America.  These missionaries are involved in numerous assignments such as church planting, chaplaincy, resort missions, social ministries, and so forth.  Southern Baptists, under the NAMB’s strategy, have been starting approximately seventeen hundred new churches a year for the last several years.  The 2004 budget was $118,285,000.  The Cooperative Program provided more than 36 percent of that total while the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering for North American Missions provided 43 percent.”[24]  As of 2015, IMB budget has grown to $121,550.[25]

Seminaries

There are six Southern Baptist seminaries. They are located in California, Missouri, Louisiana, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Texas.  They vary in size and enrollment.  “The six seminaries educated over fifteen thousand different students in 2003-04 at a cost of about $110,000,000.  The Southern Baptist Cooperative Program provided over $40,000,000 to this cause.”[26]  Southern Baptist seminaries are also funded by tuition, fees, and private donations.  Non-Southern Baptist students can enroll; however, instructors are expected to teach in accordance with the confession of faith of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission

The Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC) is the lobbying arm of the Southern Baptist Convention and maintains offices in Nashville and Washington, D.C.  “With twenty-four staff members and a 2003-2004 CP allocations of $2,825,268…With regular print and electronic media and a daily radio broadcast, the ERLC endeavors to keep Baptists and others informed and motivated about moral, cultural, and civic concerns.  The total budget in 2003-2004 was $3,385,177.”[27]   The 2014 ERLC budget was 3,190,000.[28]

LifeWay Christian Resources & GuideStone Financial Resources

LifeWay Christian Resources and GuideStone Financial Resources are controlled by the Southern Baptist Convention but are not supported by Cooperative Program Funding.  These entities are self-supporting.  LifeWay Christian Resources evolved out of the Southern Baptist Sunday School Board.  LifeWay “produces literature, Bible studies, training materials, conferences, music, and much more for all age groups and sizes and churches and organizations.  LifeWay is a very large corporation with a budget of over $450,000,000 (2004) and around fifteen hundred employees.  LifeWay Christian Resources has never received Cooperative Program funds from the Southern Baptist Convention but is self-supporting.  It invests a significant amount in Southern Baptist missions and ministries worldwide.”[29]  Guidestone Financial Resources, formerly the “Annuity Board”, provides financial and insurance services for denominational employees, seminary students, and pastors.  It supports itself through the fees it charges for providing these services.

Economics, the Anointed Class, and the SBC Demographic

“On both sides of the Atlantic, it is only a little overstated to say that we preach individualism and competitive capitalism, and practice socialism.” Milton Friedman

All Cooperative Program money is passed through state conventions, which take a cut of it to fund their own initiatives, before it is passed along to the national convention. For example, an SBC church in the state of Kentucky may send in $100 to the Kentucky Baptist Convention through the Cooperative Program.  The Kentucky state convention would keep $50 and send the remaining $50 to the national Convention in Nashville, Tennessee.[30]  Cooperative Program money passes through at least three levels of bureaucracy before it is spent: the state convention, the national convention, and the national entity.  Often these bureaucracies are headed by a member of the evangelical intelligentsia who is famous among denominationally-minded pastors but largely unknown to every-day pew-sitting Southern Baptists.  A bureaucratic intelligentsia distributing funds as it sees fit runs contrary to the political and economic views of most contemporary Southern Baptists, who, as Republicans and Libertarians, tend to favor local control and streamlined organizations.  The divide between the economic theory that drives the Cooperative Program and the economic theory that underlies free-market conservatism may be widened by the mindset of the pastors who champion the program.  Pastors who study subjects such as theology, music, and church education in bible colleges and seminaries largely do not receive instruction that focuses on economic theory as a part of their schooling.  They are, however, educated about the importance of funding the Cooperative Program, a program which in many cases subsidizes the cost of their educations.

The modern Southern Baptist Convention is essentially what Hoover Institute economist, Thomas Sowell, might call a “Vision of the Anointed.”  In his book of the same name Sowell describes a class of political elites, an intelligentsia, who are under the impression that they know what is best for people of lesser wisdom and should be given the power to structure society as they see fit.  This vision, the vision of the anointed,[31] is prominent in progressive democratic political circles.  Strangely enough, it is also prominent in the Sothern Baptist Convention.  The Anointed Class is not to be questioned.  “This (liberal) vision so permeates the media and academia, and has made such major inroads into the religious community, that many grow into adulthood unaware that there is any other way of looking at things, or that: evidence: might be relevant to checking out the sweeping assumptions of so-called ‘thinking people’. Many of these ‘thinking people’ could more accurately be characterized as: articulate: people, as people whose verbal nimbleness can elude both evidence and logic. This can be a fatal talent, when it supplies the crucial insulation from reality behind many historic catastrophes…”[32]  Those who accept the vision of the anointed “are deemed to be not only factually correct but morally on a higher plane.  Put differently, those who disagree with the prevailing vision are seen as not being not merely in error, but in sin.”[33]  Southern Baptist preachers are both articulate and highly respected among their constituencies; perhaps more so than any other group of men.  Those who support the Cooperative Program and heavy denominational influence possess the verbal nimbleness to defend their vision.  Dissent from every day Baptists to the vision of denominational leadership has been condemned at both the state and national level.

As the information age has made it easier to disseminate news to the masses, bloggers have become some of the most vocal and effective critics of SBC leadership.  This led the Georgia Baptist Convention, in 2007, to pass a resolution condemning blogging about Baptist matters.[34]  At the same time, the Georgia Convention approved a $52.3 million dollar Cooperative Program Budget.  In 2015, ERLC communications specialist, Samuel Jones, admonished readers to never start a watchdog blog.[35]  People outside of the know are encouraged to keep any objections out of the public eye, in deference to the judgment and reputation of the anointed class.

The anointed class of the SBC almost wholeheartedly endorses the Cooperative Program, which funds their own power and influence (at the expense of smaller, low-profile churches and their pastors), while completely ignoring the fact that there is a lack of economic evidence which indicates that the Cooperative Program is the best way to spend Southern Baptist money.  According to the free-market, local-control-oriented worldview of the average American conservative, such a program is folly.  The Cooperative Program is liberal progressivism in the hands of purportedly conservative theologians.  It should not escape notice that Cooperative Program was accepted by liberal progressives for years until they were ousted from the convention during the Conservative Resurgence Era.  The conservatives who took control of the convention pushed for strong doctrinal standards but maintained the liberal progressive way of funding the convention.  It funds their power and influence.  It funds their vision, whatever it may be.

It is becoming more and more expected of pastors in the convention to take on the role of the “vision caster” of their church.  According to the Pastor Emeritus of mega-church First Baptist Houston and oft-feature NAMB speaker, John Bisagno, “The pastor must be the vision caster. This means he must have a vision to cast, which presupposes time with God to receive the vision.”[36]  Bisagno is but one of the Southern Baptist Convention’s vaunted leadership gurus from the mega-church mold.  These gurus espouse what is known as a “Moses Model”[37] of church leadership in which a pastor runs a top-down organization like a CEO rather than providing boots-on-the-ground care to members of the flock.  In Pastor’s Handbook (which is offered for sale at NAMB church planting courses and assigned in SBC seminary classes), Bisagno states “Pastor those who pastor others. You must give primary attention to your leaders and their families. Most church members in the hospital may get only a phone call from the pastor. The chairman of deacons gets a visit.”[38]  The modern mega-church pastor, supposedly anointed with a vision for the people from God, is too busy managing a large organization from the top down to provide low-level pastoral care to non-leaders.  His job is to cast a vision.  Another church leadership guru, Aubrey Malphurs, wrote in his book, Being Leaders: The Authentic Nature of Christian Leadership, “A vision is the future of the ministry. Far too many churches remain stuck in the past, usually twenty to thirty years behind the culture. The vision forces them to think in terms of the future.  God uses it to help them see what their future could be.  While we can’t predict the future, the vision will…People walk away from a vision-casting session talking about what must be.”[39]  Whatever such an esoteric vision actually is, it is clear from the Baptist leadership gurus that it is bestowed by God upon anointed CEO-type pastors and it should not be questioned.

Such leaders, divorced from the responsibility of everyday pastoral care, have a greater amount of time to manage denominational concerns.  It has become expected that they should lead the Convention as a whole.  Former SBC Second VP and popular Baptist blogger Dave Miller once stated in bluntly, “Let’s face it folks, the job of SBC president is a mega-job. Mega-church pastors are mega-church pastors because they are wired that way. Their gifts, personality, calling – however you bill it.  Maybe, somewhere there is a pastor of a small-to-medium church who is able to handle this job. But guys like that usually move up.  The mega church pastors have extensive staff to keep the home-fires burning while they are out doing their denominational service. In a mega-church, the Senior Pastor is a vision-caster and idea-guy who doesn’t involve himself beyond preaching Sunday and vision-casting for the church. He’s less hands-on than pastors like me. So, while he’s out and about he can continue some of that vision-casting (I actually hate that word!) and preaching and let his staff carry on.”[40]  Even medium-sized church pastors like Dave Miller are resigned the notion that the type of pastors who “moves up”[41] is the only type of pastor suitable to run the convention.    Yet, these mega-church pastors are not representative of rank-and-file Southern Baptists.  They are a self-appointed anointed class and this class has great influence on the next of its members to be chosen for lucrative, high-profile leadership positions.

Rarely does one of the anointed fail to take his turn leading the convention. In 2006, current SBC President Ronnie Floyd actually lost an election after being nominated by former President and fellow megapastor, Johnny Hunt.  “Johnny Hunt nominated Floyd in 2006, stating that he was convinced that Ronnie Floyd was ‘the man God raised up” for the job.’  God must have disagreed with Johnny Hunt; Floyd was soundly defeated by Frank Page.  As it turns out, other Southern Baptists were not as impressed with Floyd as Hunt was.  At the time of his first nomination, Floyd’s church gave 0.27 percent of its budget to the Southern Baptist Cooperative Program.  This caused the senior pastor of Emmanuel Baptist Church, Mike Stone, to write, ‘In thousands of churches this fall, faithful pastors will face skeptical finance committees at budget preparation time.  He will go out to bat to keep CP giving strong even in light of building programs and tight budgets.  The last thing that warrior needs is for his finance committee chairman to…read that Southern Baptists elected a president whose church gave .27 percent.’”[42]   Floyd clearly failed to win his first election because he did not to kick-up enough of his mega-church’s multi-million dollar revenue to the convention’s Cooperative Program.  This evidences the existence of a perverse incentive in the Southern Baptist Convention.  A pastor’s fitness to lead is judged by the amount of money he can raise for the convention.  If a pastor wants to be a leader, he is encouraged to adopt a Moses Model, try to get a job at a bigger church, and transfer local control of his church’s money to the national convention.  This is politicking at its worst.  Furthermore, it encourages economically unwise central planning.  Local people know how best to spend their own money.  The Cooperative Program takes this money out of the hands of local decision makers and passes it through a multi-level bureaucracy stocked with partisans of those at the top. “It all boils down to a simple formula: The extent of misuse is directly proportionate to the distance between the giver and the spender.”[43]

Controversies and Mismanagement

“Though we may sometimes be forced to choose between different evils, they remain evils.” F. A. Hayek

“Hear the sirens, Hear the circus so profound.
I hear the sirens, more & more in this here town” Eddie Vedder

Problems within Southern Baptist entities are legion.  In a fallen world, it’s simply a fact of life that there will be corruption in any organization.  Powerful and wealthy organizations like the SBC are bound to draw individuals who are, at their core, greedy and unChristlike.  This unfortunate reality should not completely discourage the creation of cooperative Christian organizations but should cause their participants to be leery of potential of misdeeds: both accidental and purposeful.  Some people are just incompetent, not nefarious.  It can be hard to tell the difference.  In the end, givers to SBC entities can consider definite results even if the motives of offenders’ hearts are unknown.  The consideration of definite results should include the consideration of accountability.  Those who commit misdeeds, whether purposeful or accidental, should be held accountable.  Often times, they are not.

Of all the entities of the Southern Baptist Convention, the most egregious one is the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission.  This entity essentially provides culture warriors to see to the political interests of the SBC.  Given that, historically, the church has essentially thrived under persecution and that Christians are truly citizens of heaven, there is some question as to whether or not a denominational body should even concern itself with temporal political affairs to the level of having hired lobbyists.  In any case, the SBC does so at great expense.   Outspoken pastor Dr. Randy White has decried the ERLC as “a huge waste of money,” which has “become (again) a left-leaning social-justice agency of the SBC.”[44]  To put the spending of the ERLC in perspective, Gospel for Asia could put 8,861 national missionaries on the ground for one year for the amount of money budgeted to the ERLC by the SBC in 2014.[45]   Rather than cost-effectively sponsor foreign missions through the IMB or other organizations, the ERLC pays administrative costs for high-paid lobbyists in an expensive city like Washington, D.C.   Despite their efforts, “gay marriage” is making inroads in the United States and abortion is still legal and commonplace.  In another blunt statement Dave Miller wrote, “I can say that in my 30 years of ministry in Baptist churches, the ERLC (and its predecessor) have made no discernible impact on the work I have done or the churches I have served.”[46] Not only are ERLC lobbyists not needed and not cost effective, they seem to be underperforming.  To make matters worse, some of the political stances being taken up by the ERLC seem to run against the grain of those of every day Baptists. ERLC president Russell Moore was formerly a staffer for a democratic congressman[47] and has been shown to act like a progressive.  While taking up support of a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, Moore referred to Jesus as an “illegal immigrant”.[48] More recently, Moore advised a fellow Christian that he could be supportive of gay loved ones by attending a reception that celebrated a “gay marriage.”[49]  Unlike most Southern Baptists, the people who actually fund Moore’s salary at a grass roots level, Moore comes off as very liberal.  For some, Moore is a refreshing change from former long-time ERLC president Richard Land, who resigned among allegations of racial insensitivity and plagiarism.[50]  However, although he challenges the status quo, Moore is just a different kind of wrong.  He has even hired a different kind of employee at the ERLC; a number of his hires were not even Southern Baptist at the time of their offer of employment with the ERLC.[51]  The ERLC should not exist at all, especially with Moore at its helm.  The “ethical” needs of the convention can be fulfilled by academics.  Seminary ethics and philosophy professors can stake out biblical positions for the denomination. Lobbyists, especially liberal ones, are wasteful and insulting to everyday Southern Baptists.  Unfortunately, many every day pew-sitting Baptists do not know that the ERLC exists.  If they did, they find might it objectionable for the multiple reasons above explored.

NAMB is much more well known that the ERLC and like the ERLC, it is plagued with controversy.  An entire book was written about the financial mismanagement and culture of corruption at the North American Mission Board.  That book, Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry, was written by former NAMB Director of Marketing Mary Kinney Branson.  According to Branson hers is “a rare book.”[52]  This is because most people who left the North American Mission Board (in the midst of a brewing financial scandal) signed an agreement not to talk or write negatively about the agency or its leaders.”[53]  This Kinney finds such agreements when undertaken by secular entities to be understandable.  What Kinney does not find understandable is “why a Christian agency felt a need to require such a gag document of its employees.”[54]  During her time at NAMB, Branson “saw firsthand – or heard from reliable sources – of ice sculptures for parties, a business retreat planned around a cruise to the Bahamas, private jets for travel, and millions paid to friends for business not sent out for bids.”[55]  Branson ends her book, a recounting of her tumultuous time with NAMB, with the story of the resignation of embattled NAMB President “Hollywood” Bob Reccord.  Upon his resignation, which came as scandal over his leadership broke in the Christian press, Reccord received a $500,000 severance package.[56]  On his way out the door, Reccord arranged for a $92,000 payment to be sent to Johnny Hunt (for his Timothy-Barnabas school) and a $300,000 payment to be sent to evangelist Jay Strack.”[57]  Both men would later sign a letter vouching for the integrity of Bob Reccord.  This letter was signed by thirty-nine other high-profile Southern Baptist leaders, including eight former and future presidents of the convention.  (Within the past three years, Hunt invited Reccord to speak at his annual “Johnny Hunt Men’s Conference.”[58]) All of these men are fairly considered members of the elite SBC intelligentsia.  While they vouched for Reccord amidst scandals, rank and file NAMB employees were ask to sign confidentiality agreements.

The mismanagement of NAMB does not stop with financial scandal.  For example, In Montana NAMB has used funds to plant churches geared specifically toward racecar enthusiasts.[59] Planting churches for a group based upon their hobbies is called the “affinity church model” and it is hardly biblical.  In addition to using the affinity church model, NAMB has suggested, among other things, printing the name of one’s church on urinal cakes and placing them in the facilities of local bars and taverns as a way of advertising.  One NAMB church planter, giving the justification that his son’s travel baseball team was “his tribe” and needed to be reached, eschewed Sunday church to travel with his son’s baseball team on the weekend.  He engaged in this lifestyle while being financially supported by NAMB.[60]  Almost certainly there are NAMB missionaries who do faithfully attend and plant sound churches.  Yet, there is some question about the oversight of an organization that teaches urinal cake affinity model church growth methods especially when it draws revenue.  Giving such advice during church growth and church planting seminars is big business for NAMB (although its marketing department has been considerably reduced since the well-funded days of Branson and Reccord[61]).  At these Conferences, experts such as John Bisagno advise church planters while offering their own church-growth and management strategy books for sale.  NAMB’s overall church planting initiative is essentially a Cooperative Program growth tool.  Once planted churches take root and grow, like a fast-food franchise, they can begin sending money back to the mother convention (the effective franchisor).   Some churches fail and some churches thrive.  In denominational church-planting, as is the case with other franchising operations, one has to take risks and spend money to make money.  The overall idea of church-planting is certainly great-commission oriented and should not be decried.  However, making a policy of planting a churches managed by a denominational employee reflects an Episcopal, and not Baptist, ecclesiology.  Local churches should be planted and spun-off from local churches and local people.

NAMB employees plant churches in ostensibly underserved municipalities designated as “send cities.”[62]  These cities are essentially areas in which the SBC has low market share and therefore has room to expand.[63]  Randy White has written that NAMB should, “fulfill all of its convention assignments, and not be just the large-city church planting agency of the SBC.”[64]  White may have not considered that there is perhaps more money to be made in the large cities.[65]  It should also be remembered that the SBC lost ground in these “send cities”[66] due to the white flight of urban churches to suburbia during the past few decades.  According to Bill Leonard, professor of Church history at Wake Forest Divinity School, “Southern Baptists are experiencing such demographic trauma of membership and baptism they need new constituencies among nonwhite population.”[67]  It is arguably this need that is directing NAMB into urban areas.  Such an argument is strengthened by the recent activity of the ERLC.  Not only has Russell Moore called for a path to citizenship for Hispanic illegal immigrants, the ERLC recently held a leadership summit on the subject of “The Gospel and Racial Reconciliation”.[68] Before the well-publicized shooting death of a black suspect by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri (a suburb of “Send City” St. Louis Missouri) and the racial rioting that followed, the ERLC summit’s planned topic was “Developing a Pro-Life Ethic”.[69]  It is essential, if Cooperative Program funding levels are to be sustained, for the SBC to increase its membership among minorities, who tend to be more church-going than the non-white population as the overall population of America becomes more secular.[70]

One of the speakers at the ERLC leadership summit on racial reconciliation was Dr. David Uth, the senior pastor of First Baptist Church of Orlando.[71]  Uth is one of the forty-one signers of the letter written in support of former NAMB President Bob Reccord.[72]  Uth is also a featured speaker at the 2015 Southern Baptist Convention Pastor’s Conference.[73]  The organizer of the Pastor’s Conference, Willy Rice, faced significant criticism for inviting political pundit and confessed Seventh Day Adventist Ben Carson to speak at the conference.[74]  Not only is Carson a member of a Christian cult,[75] he is a Republican candidate for the Presidency of the United States.  Carson declared his candidacy shortly after his invitation to speak at the Pastor’s Conference was rescinded.  According to multiple Baptist objectors, the invitation of a political figure and cult member to speak at the Pastor’s Conference was inappropriate.  These objections and the rescinding of Carson’s invitation were an implicit repudiation of David Uth for his decision to have Ben Carson speak to the congregation of First Baptist Orlando during Sunday services in June 2014.[76]  Such a rebuke is rare for a member of the intelligentsia who carries enough clout to be a featured speaker and the Pastor’s Conference and the ERLC summit in the same year.

The Pastor’s Conference is where the intelligentsia gathers each year before the annual convention begins.  The 2015 Pastor’s Conference speakers schedule features the President of the IMB as well as the President of the ERLC.  It also features current SBC President, Ronnie Floyd, who will be nominated for another term at the helm of the SBC at the 2015 Convention by J.D. Greear.[77]  Greer is also a Pastor’s Conference speaker.[78]  The Pastor’s Conference is effectively a preconvention strategy gathering for the SBC elite.  Furthermore, it provides a high-profile forum by which the SBC elite can present themselves to the general population of pastors as leaders to be followed.  In 1979 the Pastor’s Conference was the launching pad for the election of Adrian Rogers to the presidency of the Southern Baptist Convention.[79]  Rogers’ election was the first step in the decade-long plan, now known as Conservative Resurgence, to eliminate moderates and liberal from the convention.  It took power consolidation to make the plan a success.  Now, with the moderates and liberals gone, convention influence still seems to remain consolidated in the hands of a small group of SBC intelligentsia.  It is important for those who want to direct the convention to control the presidency of the SBC because the president appoints the trustees of the various Southern Baptist causes.  Conservative Resurgence architect Paul Pressler once remarked, “The lifeblood of the Southern Baptist Convention is the trustees.  We need to go for the jugular – we need to go for the trustees.”[80]  Pressler got them.  He perhaps got them a little too well, however.  The trustee system is intended to keep entity leadership accountable and in-order.  However, trustees do not always act to do such.  Former Pressler operative C.B. Scott has remarked that SBC trustees tend to be “boot-lickers” and “bologna sniffers.”[81] Trustees, who are often wined and grape-juiced, by charismatic and influential entity heads can lose their objectivity.[82]  Those who serve as trustees have the potential to be appointed to high-profile and highly-compensated denominational jobs themselves.  Demanding accountability may reduce the chances of their own political success.  Given the culture of secrecy and confidentiality agreements in the SBC, it is hard to find public information about the moral hazards of the trustee system.[83]  The nature of the Conservative Resurgence demanded strong collusion between entity heads, trustees, denominational officials, and the architects of the resurgence.  Unfortunately, ridding the convention of liberals seems to have created a cabal of power brokers who take care of themselves and their own before the conventions best interest.  Currently, the convention seems interested in attracting conservative nonwhites.  Ben Carson is perhaps the most popular conservative nonwhite in the United States.  Intelligentsia members such as David Uth were willing to compromise doctrinal principles for political ones by inviting Carson to one of the most influential events in SBC culture.

The Pastor’s Conference “may cost approximately $200,000 to $350,000.”[84]  These amounts are greater than the yearly budgets of many small SBC churches.  The use of such amounts of money to produce a conference where pastors preach to other pastors is questionable.  Unfortunately, the questionable use of denominational funds for the enjoyment of an anointed few is no uncommon in the SBC arena.  Nor is it limited to the national level.  Wasteful and questionable spending is apparent in state conventions as well.  The palatial headquarters of the Georgia Baptist Convention cost upwards of $42,000,000 dollars to construct.  The debt incurred to pay for the construction was eventually paid off using funds formerly designated for medical missions.[85]  The ostentatious headquarters of the state convention is a place many pew-sitting Georgia Baptists will never see, yet it is one they fund with their giving.  They also fund three colleges.  One of the colleges, Brewton-Parker, has been embroiled in financial scandal and other problems for over a decade.[86]  It was recently rocked by a race scandal which led to the resignation of its already controversial president, Ergun Caner.  The employee who blew the whistle on Caner for his inappropriate action, C.B. Scott was fired and asked to sign a confidentiality agreement or immediately lose his insurance benefits.  The elderly Scott refused as a matter of personal integrity.  Had he not done so, another Baptist scandal may have been swept under the rug.[87]  Confidentiality agreements were semi-successfully used to sweep a scandal under the rug at Louisiana Baptist College.[88]  The story is similar to others in that an embattled entity president, Joe Aguillard in the case of Louisiana College, left his office under suspicious circumstances with a six-figure compensation package.[89]  Louisiana College’s controlling state convention is so problematic that a new state Baptist association was formed in Louisiana by former college administrator, Tim Johnson.  According to Johnson, “There’s too much power in the Baptist Building (LBC office in Alexandria) because there’s too much money.  With the amount of money there, the power’s there with it. And that’s the problem with our state.”[90]  One trustee of Louisiana Baptist College, Jay Adkins, attempted to publically expose the secretive actions of Louisiana College officials which were, arguably, undertaken in order to cover-up the malfeasance that occurred during Aguillard’s tenure.  However, Adkins achieved limited success and was met with stern resistance from convention insiders.  Adkins detailed his trying and compelling story in a series of personal blogs.[91]  The Executive Director of the Louisiana Baptist Convention is David Hankins, who co-authored the book One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists in which he encourages participation in the very Cooperative Program that funds his own scandal-plagued state convention.

On a national educational level, scandals seem to be rarer.  The six Southern Baptist seminaries are among the last institutions of theological higher learning in western culture that teach from a high view of scripture.[92]  These seminaries, because they exist to train Christian ministers, hold their students to considerably different standards than do secular schools.  Most notably, students are expected to be Christians and to live out a Christian lifestyle.  However, in 2014, an exception was granted to these standards at Southwestern Baptist Theological seminary.  Acting unilaterally, Page Patterson, the co-architect of the Conservative Resurgence the President of that school, admitted a practicing Muslim student into the school’s archaeology program.[93]  The reaction to this violation of seminary standards was mixed.  Some were outraged.  Others argued that the matter was a justified form of evangelism.[94]  This mixed reaction provides a perfect example of how the Cooperative Program fails to distribute funding in keeping with the specific concerns of the giver.  Rather than distributing money broadly to all seminaries through the Cooperative Program, a giver who disapproved Patterson’s actions could refrain from giving to Southwestern but freely give direct gifts to the other seminaries. Those givers who approved Patterson’s actions could continue to give to his school.  These direct giving options are available now but many fail to exercise them in deference to the Cooperative Program.  For all of the controversies discussed above, there are Southern Baptists on both sides of them.  It seems counterintuitive to expect all Baptists to broadly fund controversies to which they object, yet that’s exactly what the Cooperative Program is designed to actualize.

Big Pastors, Little Churches

“For all our lives the presidents of the SBC have been luminaries and mega-church pastors – celebrities who live in different worlds than we do. They don’t really understand how we live and we don’t really understand how they live.” Dave Miller, former 2nd VP of the SBC

As of 2007, sixty percent of SBC churches had less than 300 members.[95]  In order to support their families, the pastors of smaller congregations often have to work a second, secular job in addition to fulfilling their pastoral duties.  According to Frank Page, Southern Baptist Executive Committee President, “Some would say 35,000 of our 46,000 churches, maybe more than that, are in the two categories of small church or bivocational.”[96] Small-churches are the back-bone and norm of the Southern Baptist Convention.  Page has communicated that such churches are the “best way to make disciples in the 21st Century.”[97]  Yet SBC Presidents are often mega-church pastors with national followings.  In the last two decades there has been an almost unbroken chain of mega-church pastors elected to the presidency of the Southern Baptist Convention.  The current president of the Southern Baptist Convention, Ronnie Floyd, pastors a multi-site mega-church.[98]  Multi-site churches strain the limits of Baptist ecclesiology.[99]  Despite their questionable theological appropriateness, they are growing in popularity.  According to an article written by LifeWay researcher, Ed Stetzer, at Christianity Today, “Among recent church trends, we continue to see multisite churches becoming more and more common. No longer just a new trend, they now number more than 5,000 churches, and growing. Among the 100 Largest churches, we find only 12 have a single campus…On the Fastest-Growing list, the number with a single campus is much greater—42, reflecting close to a split in the number of churches that do and do not have multiple campuses. Multisite is the new normal among large churches and widely embraced elsewhere.”[100]  Multi-site mega churches and mega preachers are not the norm of the Southern Baptist Convention.  Yet mega preachers are commonly elected to lead the convention.  The careers of these men are advanced.  Their books are sold.  Their speaking schedules are booked.  They become Christian celebrities.  Big Pastors grow rich and famous off of little churches.

The average Southern Baptist pastor is hardly a popular celebrity.  The average Southern Baptist pastor is hardly represented by the men who have recently held the presidency of the Southern Baptist Convention.  Although many of them sit on trustee boards, small church pastors are not a part of the oligarchy of elite power brokers that steer the convention.  (They are too busy serving their flocks and trying to make a living.)  Given that the Southern Baptist Convention is a democratic organization, it seems strange that obscure small-church pastors would elect multi-site mega preachers to lead their denominational organization.   Yet, it appears that they do.  A review of Southern Baptist Convention attendance records, however, indicates otherwise.  Small church pastors are, by and large, not electing un-relatable mega preachers.  In 2004, 8,600 messengers attended the Southern Baptist Convention.  At that time there were 43,465 affiliated congregations.[101]  That’s an attendance rate of less than 20%.  Such attendance is likely skewed towards larger church pastors who have the budget to make the expensive trip to whatever city in which the convention is held.  In many cases, the pastors of small churches can’t afford to go to the convention and don’t pay attention to what goes on there.  Still, politically disinterested small-churches send in Cooperative Program money to be controlled and distributed by the elite oligarchy.  This is terrible stewardship.  Millions and millions of Cooperative Program dollars are contributed by churches who put forth little to no effort towards seeing how reasonably it is spent.  Small church pastors should stop depending on unchecked bureaucrats to spend their precious mission funds.

Apathy Among the Laity

“There is an increasing tendency among modern men to imagine themselves ethical because they have delegated their vices to larger and larger groups.” Reinhold Niebuhr

“Rather than useful jobs in our country, people have been offered bureaucratic ‘make work,’ rather than moral leadership, they have been given bread and circuses, spectacles, and, yes, they have even been given scandals. Tonight there is violence in our streets, corruption in our highest offices, aimlessness among our youth, anxiety among our elders and there is a virtual despair among the many who look beyond material success for the inner meaning of their lives. Where examples of morality should be set, the opposite is seen. Small men, seeking great wealth or power, have too often and too long turned even the highest levels of public service into mere personal opportunity.” Barry Goldwater

Congregants in church pews are perhaps even less engaged than their pastors when it comes to being aware and concerned about how the SBC operates and spends Cooperative Program funds.  The money that funds the state and national SBC network doesn’t just come from local churches, it comes from the pockets of pew-sitting Christians.  In the American church, the pew is fast becoming indistinguishable from the theater seat.   Both church music and preaching is becoming more and more entertainment-driven and less and less spiritually challenging.  Preachers can draw cheers by preaching politically palatable (and profitable) sermons that never convict congregants of sin.  This entertainment-driven and consumerist environment is an outworking of a seeker-sensitive mindset.  Priority is placed on getting lost people in the door and not upsetting them too much where they’ll leave.  Under this culture of revivalism, the evangelical movement has “cast aside an older model of leaders as holy men and instead (given) rise to leaders who (are) entrepreneurs – pragmatic marketers who (are) willing to use whatever (works) to get conversion.”[102]  The revivalistic seeker-sensitive mindset persists because personal evangelism rates among the laity are shamefully low.  “Only half (52%) of born again Christians say they actually did share the Gospel at least once this past year to someone with different beliefs, in the hope that they might accept Jesus Christ as their Savior.”[103]  Low personal evangelism rates are consistent with the “invest-and-invite” model that has been modeled by Baptist churches in recent decades.  Congregants give. Churches build buildings.  Congregants invite “seekers” to hear evangelistic messages given in big buildings by paid professional preachers.  Evangelism and missions, like many other tasks in the American economy, are outsourced to hired guns.  The SBC is perhaps the biggest hired gun in Christendom.  Apathetic and disengaged pew-sitters hire-out their great commission responsibilities at state, national, and international levels by giving to money to the Cooperative Program through their local church.  Without knowing to what and to whom they are giving, apathetic laypeople fund a largely unaccountable denominational bureaucracy.  Baptist laypeople should stop depending on unchecked bureaucrats to spend their precious mission funds.  It’s almost inexplicable that many every day Baptists are fed up with a massive, unaccountable federal government that taxes heavily and spends irresponsibly and contrary to their ideals but do next to nothing to exact denominational leaders to the same degree of scrutiny with which they examine the federal government.

Stewardship and Ecclesiology

We’ve all heard it hundreds of times—SBC Headquarters is the local church and not some denominational agency. If this line is nothing more than a misleading notion humbly tossed out under the pretense of sounding spiritual, then we should stop saying things we do not really mean.” Rick Patrick[104]

Church members are obligated to support their local congregations.  However, their ecclesiastical fiscal responsibility stops there.  There is absolutely no scriptural prescription for giving to the Cooperative Program or any other denominational cause.  There is a biblical mandate for good stewardship, however.  Since all local Baptist churches are autonomous, church members have the right and responsibility to consider whether or not it is a good stewardship to give undesignated funds to the Cooperative Program.  Such funds will be spent at the discretion of convention leadership or a denominational agency. Despite the protests that may come from denominationally indoctrinated pastors, it is not the responsible of a Southern Baptist church to give away money to relic of 1920s era progressivism, especially when the information age makes giving directly to a specific cause so much easier than it was to do in the 1920s.

Despite any misconceptions to the contrary, a church does is not required to give to the Cooperative Program in order to be considered Southern Baptist.  “A church is Southern Baptist by definition if it participates with the Southern Baptist Convention in at least one of the following ways: (1) gives to the Cooperative Program; (2) gives to the Lottie Moon Offering, IMB directly; (3) gives to the Annie Armstrong Offering, NAMB, directly; (4) is dually aligned with the SBC; (5) is a member of a local SBC Association; or (6) gives to the SBC Executive Board directly.”[105]  Giving to a local SBC association, for example, qualifies a church as “Southern Baptist”.  Its ministers are therefore eligible for Guidestone participation and its members are therefore eligible for discounted tuition at a Southern Baptist seminary.  Giving locally and directly not only qualifies a church to be a part of the SBC, it is conducive to better stewardship.  Receivers of local and directly given money are inherently more accountable.

Giving Around the Cooperative Program

“We shall not grow wiser before we learn that much that we have done was very foolish.” F. A. Hayek[106]

No program is needed to facilitate giving to Baptist causes; any SBC entity will gladly accept a check from any church or individual person.  Mission board websites allow for on-line giving to specific programs (printing Bibles, buying meals in Africa, disaster relief, etc…) Seminaries have scholarship programs by which individuals can sponsor individual students.  An individual person can simply write a check to a seminary student (or school, or professor) they know and trust.  In fact, he can write a check to any needy person without the need for a national program to pass the money through three levels of bureaucracy.  International Missionaries are now available to Skype live from the mission field with the local churches that support them.  A local church does not need to go through IMB to support and interact with a foreign missionary.  The internet lists countless Baptist church plants that need support; money does not need to be passed through NAMB to get it to them.[107]  If someone was so inclined, he could even give money to the ERLC political cause.  If churches favor giving generally to entities such as the IMB, they can.  Churches who operate under unfavorable state conventions can give around them by giving straight to national causes.  Churches who prefer their state and local conventions can give designated funds to those organizations.

Direct giving is, at its core, free-market giving.  Giving through the Cooperative Program is essentially like asking one’s church to ask the state convention to ask the national convention to go to the grocery store to buy his groceries.  It would be more efficient if he went to the store himself and bought his own groceries.  He would get exactly what he wanted.  He would know exactly what everything costs.  He would think about what he was spending.  Direct giving engenders better stewardship because the giver has to consider the merits of the cause to which he is giving.  The direct giver sees every cent and can hold the receiver directly accountable…as God will surely hold him accountable.

There is no need to continue to engage in Cooperative Program giving, it is tantamount to Baptist socialism.  It has a caused enough ills.  It’s time for fiscally social conservative Baptists to pull their money and that of their churches out of the pockets of the mega preachers and denominational elites.  These men have, for far too long, have bestrode the narrow Baptist world like a colossus.  Their multisite churches are growing beyond control at a rate similar to the bloated United States government.  Their political machinations are more concerned with earthly kingdoms than heavenly ones.   Those who continue to financially support them are on a road to serfdom.  It’s time for those people to come off of it by implementing direct giving.

Those who do so may face stern opposition from those who have been long-time supporters of the Cooperative Program.  “When Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom attacked the welfare state and socialism in 1944, he characterized his adversaries as ‘single-minded idealists’ and ‘authors whose sincerity and disinterestedness are above suspicion,’ but his own book was treated as something immoral…”[108]  There are many good, well-intentioned Baptists who, to their own folly, support the Cooperative Program.  Speaking at a press conference, the first SBC President of the Conservative Resurgence, Adrian Rogers, remarked that Southern Baptists “have made a golden calf of the (Cooperative) program…It’s almost easier to be against the Virgin Birth than the program.”[109]  Pastors and lay people who advocate giving around the Cooperative Program should be prepared to face stern resistance from those who are faced with melting down their long-time idol and drinking a bitter elixir made from its ashes.

*Please note that the preceding is my personal opinion. It is not necessarily the opinion of any entity by which I am employed, any church at which I am a member, any church which I attend, or the educational institution at which I am enrolled. Any copyrighted material displayed or referenced is done under the doctrine of fair use.

Bibliography

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Appendix 1

 Appendix 2 

1924 Presidential Election Map

1928 Presidential Election Map

 1932 Presidential Election Map

1936 Presidential Election Map

1940 Presidential Election Map

Footnotes

[1] Southern Baptists claimed a membership of 16,267,494 affiliated with 43,465 in 2004, according to Brand and Hankins

[2] I refer to the Baptist Faith and Message 2000

[3] Brand, C. O. (2009). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Academic. p. 100

[4] ibid

  1. 112

[5] ibid p.3

[6] Sowell, T. (2008, December 23). Another Great Depression? . Retrieved November 2014, 30, from NationalReview.com: http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/226599/another-great-depression/thomas-sowell/page/0/1

[7] Baptist Studies Online. (2007, February). Original Constitution of the Southern Baptist Convention. Retrieved November 30, 2014, from http://baptiststudiesonline.com/: http://baptiststudiesonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/constitution-of-the-sbc.pdf

[8] Brand, C. O. (2009). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Academic p. 2-3

[9] ibid p. 2

[10]ibid p. 1

[11] Cumings, B. (2009). Dominion from Sea to Sea: Pacific Ascendancy and American Power. Yale University Press p. 259

[12] ibid

[13] See Appendix 1. For more information see “How the Faithful Voted” at the Pew Forum website.

[14] See Appendix 2. States in which the Democratic Candidate prevailed are show in blue.

[15] Georgia Bapist Convention. (2013). We Believe In the Cooperative Program. Retrieved May 22, 2015, from Georgia Bapist Convention: http://gabaptist.org/we-believe-in-cp/

[16] Greenspan, A. (2008). The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World. Penguin p. 267

[17] Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC p. 15-16

[18] ibid p. 17

[19] Adjusted by the Consumer Price Index, this amount of money is worth 307,060,000 in 2015 dollars.  This means that the IMB budget has outpaced inflation while reducing its headcount of field missionaries since 2004.  I used the following online calculator to perform CPI calculations: https://www.minneapolisfed.org/

[20] Brand, C. O. (2009). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Academic p.141

[21] IMB. (2015). Fast facts. Retrieved May 28, 2015, from http://www.imb.org: http://www.imb.org/1307.aspx#.VWer0PlVhBc

[22] ibid

[23] http://baptistbanner.org/Subarchive_4/410%20GCRTF%20Glen%20Land.htm

[24] ibid

[25] NAMB. (2015). *2015 NORTH AMERICAN MISSION BOARD MINISTRY REPORT. Retrieved May 28, 2015, from http://www.namb.net: http://www.namb.net/annualreport/

[26] Ibid p.142

[27] ibid

[28] Strode, T. (2013, September 13). TRUSTEES: ERLC budget set at $3.19M. Retrieved May 28, 2015, from Baptist Press: http://www.bpnews.net/41089/trustees-erlc-budget-set-at-319m

[29] Brand, C. O. (2009). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Academic p.143

[30] I used a 50/50 split as an example.  I did not confirm the actual CP distribution percentage used by the Kentucky Baptist Convention.

[31] The technical name Sowell gives for this vision is the “unconstrained vision.”  Those who hold to this vision believe that an anointed class is in best position to make beneficial decisions for society.  It is often associated with liberal academics and big-government progressives.  The antithesis of this vision is the “constrained vision”.  Those who hold to this view believe that society is too complicated for an elite group to centrally plan what is best for ever.  It is also associated with free-market capitalists.  For more on these competing worldviews see Sowell’s book A Conflict of Visions.

[32] Sowell, T. (1995). The Vision of the Annointed. Basic Books. p.6

[33] Sowell, T. (1995). The Vision of the Annointed. Basic Books. p.3

[34] Elliot, H. (2007, November 27). Georgia Baptist resolution criticizes Baptist blogs. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from Baptist Standard Publishing: https://www.baptiststandard.com/resources/archives/47-2007-archives/7247-georgia-baptist-resolution-criticizes-baptist-blogs

[35] James, S. (2015, MAy 7). What Not to Do When a Fellow Christian Embarrases Us. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from Patheos.com: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/inklingations/2015/05/07/what-not-to-do-when-a-fellow-christian-embarrasses-the-rest-of-us/

[36] Bisagno, J. R. (2011). Pastor’s Handbook n (Kindle Edition ed.). B&H Publishing. p. 25

[37] For a more in-depth critique of the Moses Model see my article “Dismantling the Jethro Principle” at https://gsethdunn.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/dismantling-the-jethro-principal/

[38] Bisagno, J. R. (2011). Pastor’s Handbook n (Kindle Edition ed.). B&H Publishing. p. 75

[39] Malphurs, A. (2003-09-01). Being Leaders: The Nature of Authentic Christian Leadership (Kindle Edition ed.). Baker Publishing Group.

[40] Miller, D. (2015, May 8). “Dave Miller for President” and Other Dumb Ideas! Retrieved May 16, 2015, from SBCVoices.com: http://sbcvoices.com/dave-miller-for-president-and-other-dumb-ideas/

[41] The reader should ask himself if an ambitious career-oriented pastor is the kind of shepherd he desires for his family and church.

[42] Dunn, S. (2014, June). Jared Moore or Ronnie Floyd? 10 Points for Gryffindor. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from gsethdunn.wordpress.com: https://gsethdunn.wordpress.com/2014/06/06/jared-moore-or-ronnie-floyd-10-points-for-gryffindor/

[43] Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC. p.4

[44] White, R. (2014, December 28). Why I’m joining #the15, and I’m not even an angry Calvinist . Retrieved May 2015, 2015, from Randy White Ministries: http://www.randywhiteministries.org/2014/12/28/ive-joined-the15-im-even-angry-calvinist/#sthash.Msr4jH7X.dpuf

[45] The 2014 ERLC budget was $3.19M according to a Baptist Press article dated September 13, 2013.  According to the Gospel for Asia website, an Asian national missionary can be sponsored for $360/year.

[46] Miller, D. (2010, November 2010). A Great Commission Suggestion: Pink Slip the ERLC. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from SBC Voices: http://sbcvoices.com/a-great-commission-suggestion-pink-slip-the-erlc/

[47] ERLC. (2013, May 30). Russell Moore: The call to ministry & the public square. Retrieved MAy 16, 2015, from ERLC.com: http://erlc.com/article/russell-moore-the-call-to-ministry-the-public-square

[48] Moore, R. D. (2011, June 11). Immigration and the Gospel. Retrieved May 15, 2015, from RussellMoore.com: http://www.russellmoore.com/2011/06/17/immigration-and-the-gospel/

[49] Dunn, S. (2014, November 3). Celebrating Sin? Retrieved May 30, 2015, from The Pulpit and Pen: http://pulpitandpen.org/2014/11/03/celebrating-sin/

[50] Kwon, L. (2012, June 1). So. Baptist Leader Richard Land Reprimanded OVer Traymon Martin Comments. Retrieved May 30, 2015, from The Christian Post: http://www.christianpost.com/news/so-baptist-richard-land-reprimanded-over-trayvon-martin-comments-75927/

[51] Patrick, R. (2014, January 21). Memo from SBC Headquarters. Retrieved November 11, 2014, from SBC Voices: http://sbcvoices.com/memo-from-sbc-headquarters/

[52]Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC. p.3

[53] ibid

[54] ibid

[55] Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC. p.5

[56] Baptist News Global. (2007, March 26). Church’s offering for Reccord raises questions about six-figure severance – See more at: http://baptistnews.com/archives/item/2021-churchs-offering-for-reccord-raises-questions-about-six-figure-severance#sthash.iPYPX4Dj.dpuf. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from Baptist News Global: http://baptistnews.com/archives/item/2021-churchs-offering-for-reccord-raises-questions-about-six-figure-severance

[57] Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC. p.113

[58] Dunn, S. (2014, June). Jared Moore or Ronnie Floyd? 10 Points for Gryffindor. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from gsethdunn.wordpress.com: https://gsethdunn.wordpress.com/2014/06/06/jared-moore-or-ronnie-floyd-10-points-for-gryffindor/

[59] Modern Day Downgrade A Call for Repentance to Southern Baptists and Other Evangelicals.

[60] ibid

[61] As of three years ago the NAMB marketing department consisted of a single person Ashley.  I know this from personal experience.  Ashley is a schoolmate of mine and an intelligent young woman.  She did not contribute an opinion for this document.

[62] North American Mission Board. (n.d.). Send Ciites. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from North American Mission Board: http://www.namb.net/cities/

[63] The Send City program is very similar to an older NAMB program called “Strategic Focus Cities.”  $14.1 million dollars was directed to the Strategic Focus Cities program in 2006. More information about NAMB activity at that time can be found in a Baptist News Global article located here: https://baptistnews.com/archives/item/948-southern-baptist-missions-suffering-under-nambs-leadership-report-says

[64] White, R. (2014, December 28). Why I’m joining #the15, and I’m not even an angry Calvinist . Retrieved May 2015, 2015, from Randy White Ministries: http://www.randywhiteministries.org/2014/12/28/ive-joined-the15-im-even-angry-calvinist/#sthash.Msr4jH7X.dpuf

[65] ibid

[66] This is especially apparent near the city of Atlanta, where I worked for nearly a decade.

[67] Horton, G. &. (2014, May). Southern Baptists to open their ranks to missionaries who speak in tongues. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from The Washington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/religion/southern-baptists-to-open-their-ranks-to-missionaries-who-speak-in-tongues/2015/05/14/1fddd28a-fa7e-11e4-a47c-e56f4db884ed_story.html

[68] ERLC. (n.d.). Ledership Summit. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from ERLC.com: https://erlc.com/summit2015

[69] Strode, T. (2015, December 2015). ERLC Turns to Race Issue for March Summit. Retrieved May 17, 2015, from Pastors.com: http://pastors.com/erlc-turns-race-issue-march-summit/

[70] Smietana, B. (2014). Are Millennials Really Leaving the Church? Yes — but Mostly White Millennials . Retrieved May 17, 2015, from FaithStreet.com: https://www.faithstreet.com/onfaith/2014/05/16/are-millennials-really-leaving-church-yes-but-mostly-white-millennials/32103

[71] ERLC. (n.d.). Ledership Summit. Retrieved May 16, 2015, from ERLC.com: https://erlc.com/summit2015/schedule

[72] Branson, M. K. (2007). Spending God’s Money: Extravagance and Misuse in the Name of Ministry. Lee’s Summit, MO: Father’s Press, LLC. p.184

[73] Calvary Church 2014-15. (2015). About The 2015 SBC Pastors’ Conference. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from SBCPC.com: http://www.sbcpc.net/#speakers

[74] Dunn, S. (2015, May 7). Ben Carson, the IRS, and an Implicit Rebuke of David Uth and First Baptist Orlando. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from pulpitandpen.org: http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/05/07/ben-carson-the-irs-and-an-implicit-rebuke-of-jeff-uth-and-first-baptist-orlando/

[75] Seventh Day Adventists believe, among other strange doctrines, that Jesus Christ and the angel Michael are the same person.  When considered against Southern Baptist Doctrine, many Seventh Day Adventist beliefs are heretical.

[76] Dunn, S. (2015, May 7). Ben Carson, the IRS, and an Implicit Rebuke of David Uth and First Baptist Orlando. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from pulpitandpen.org: http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/05/07/ben-carson-the-irs-and-an-implicit-rebuke-of-jeff-uth-and-first-baptist-orlando/

[77] Baptist Press. (2015, April 20). Greear to nominate Floyd for 2nd term. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from Baptist Press: http://www.bpnews.net/44590/greear-to-nominate-floyd-for-2nd-term

[78] Calvary Church 2014-15. (2015). About The 2015 SBC Pastors’ Conference. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from SBCPC.com: http://www.sbcpc.net/#speakers

[79] Hefley, J. C. (1989). The Truth in Crisis: The Controversy in the Southern Baptist Convention (Vol. 4). Hannibal Books p.6

[80] ibid

[81] These adjectives were used by C.B. Scott in a phone conversation with me.  We were discusses the weaknesses of trustees at Baptist entities. Scott is a veteran of the Conservative Resurgence.

[82] I am personally reminded of the story of F. Ross Johnson, the former President who essentially tried to “steal the company” using a leveraged buyout.  Johnson was an expert in manipulating his board of directors.  His story can be found in Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco by John Heylar

[83] I do not have at my disposal many published sources to support this argument.  I do not, however, make it out of complete ignorance of the trustee culture.

[84] This is according to Dr. Rick Patrick of Southern Baptist Interest group Connect 316.  His comments and a discussion around them can be found at http://sbcvoices.com/breaking-news-sbc-will-survive-carsons-appearance-at-the-pastors-conference/#comment-287672

[85] Dunn, S. (2015, March 19). Lifestyles of the Rich and Baptist: Creflo Dollar and Robert White. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from PulpitandPen.org: http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/03/19/lifestyles-of-the-rich-and-baptist-creflo-dollar-and-robert-white/

[86] Dunn, S. (2013, December). Brewton Parker, Ergun Caner and the Issue of Stewardship: A Georgia Baptist Reaction and Solution by G. Seth Dunn, CPA, MACC. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from gsethdunn.wordpress.com: https://gsethdunn.wordpress.com/2013/12/16/brewton-parker-ergun-caner-and-the-issue-of-stewardship-a-georgia-baptist-reaction-and-solution-by-g-seth-dunn-cpa-macc/

[87] McKissic Sr., W. D. (2015, February 5). IS A GEORGIA BAPTIST COLLEGE COVERING UP RACISM? Retrieved May 18, 2015, from dwightmckissic.wordpress.com: https://dwightmckissic.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/is-a-georgia-baptist-college-covering-up-racism/

[88] Allen, B. (2014, February 28). Documents suggest Louisiana College paid hush money to potential whistleblower – See more at: https://baptistnews.com/ministry/organizations/item/28411-documents-suggest-louisiana-college-paid-hush-money-to-potential-whistleblower#sthash.imfDPnoV.dpuf. Retrieved May 20, 2015, from Baptist News Global

[89] Reynoso, R. (2014, April 16). Faith on View. Retrieved May 20, 2015, from Louisiana College: lies, obfuscation, and a lack of repentance: http://www.faithonview.com/louisiana-college-lies-obfuscation-and-a-lack-of-repentance/

[90] Fryer, K. (2015, 21 January). LBC PASTORS: “TOO MUCH POWER IN THE BAPTIST BUILDING”. Retrieved May 18, 2015, from pulpitandpen.org: http://pulpitandpen.org/2015/01/21/lbc-pastors-too-much-power-in-the-baptist-building/

[91] The story of Jay Adkin’s struggle to improve the situation at Louisiana College can be found at his blog, The Crescent Crier.

[92] For the purposes of full disclosure, I do not write from an objective position about SBC seminaries.  I attend an SBC seminary and am quite fond of the institution which I attend.  I hold to a high view of scripture and naturally favor any institution that teaches from that same view.

[93] Burleson, W. (2014, May 16). Istoria Ministries Blog. Retrieved May 20, 2015, from Southwestern Baptist Islamic Theological Seminary and the Center for Cultural Engagement and Firing: http://www.wadeburleson.org/2014/05/southwestern-baptist-islamic.html

[94] I do not cite specific published documents here but recall my own memories of the various reactions to the Muslim student’s enrollment at SWBTS.  I spoke with Dr. Patterson about the matter myself; he handled the matter quite gracefully.  I personally did not support the enrollment of the non-Christian student, who has now left the school.  I did not agree with any of the arguments used to justify the enrollment.

[95] Kumer, T. (2007, May 7). Little People In Little Places: The Average Size Of SBC Churches. Retrieved April 24, 2015, from Said at Southern: http://saidatsouthern.com/little-people-in-little-places-the-average-size-of-sbc-churches/

[96] Chandler, D. (2014, September 17). Bivocational church model best, Page says. Retrieved April 24, 2015, from Baptist Press: http://www.bpnews.net/43375/bivocational-church-model-best-page-says

[97] ibid

[98] In recent years, Floyd’s church has removed the word “Baptist” from its name.

[99] But not franchise business models

[100] Stetzer, E. (2014, February 2014). Multisite Churches are Here, and Here, and Here to Stay. Retrieved April 24, 2014, from Christianity Today: http://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2014/february/multisite-churches-are-here-to-stay.html

[101] Brand, C. O. (2009). One Sacred Effort: The Cooperative Program of Southern Baptists. B&H Academic p.102

[102]Pearcy, N. (2004). Total Truth: Liberating Christianity from Its Cultural Captivity. Crossway Books p. 286

[103] Barna Group. (2013). Is Evangelism Going Out of Style? Retrieved April 24, 2015, from Barna Group: https://www.barna.org/barna-update/faith-spirituality/648-is-evangelism-going-out-of-style#.VTsL0CHBzRY

[104] Patrick, R. (2014, January 21). Memo from SBC Headquarters. Retrieved November 11, 2014, from SBC Today: http://sbcvoices.com/memo-from-sbc-headquarters/

[105] My source on this is a church endorsement form from a Southern Baptist Seminary.

[106] Hayek, F. A. (1972). The Road to Serfdom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

[107] While their IMB counterparts are generally able to depend on salaries paid by IMB, NAMB missionaries are largely expected to raise their own personal financial support.

[108] Sowell, T. (1995). The Vision of the Annointed. Basic Books p.3

[109] Shurden, W. B. (1996). Going for the Jugular: A Documentary History of the SBC Holy War. Mercer University Press.